USPSA: B-Card en route, mostly with Steyr

Discussion in 'Competition Shooting' started by ThaiBoxer, Aug 18, 2009.

  1. ThaiBoxer

    ThaiBoxer Active Member

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    My B-card is on the way, I just saw. Took awhile to get there, I mentally started going after it in January. I think I'll need to start dry-fire practice in earnest to get to A. I have a fast draw, but I need to get better at consolidating the sight pic/presentation before the shot, too often am losing about .25 second in pulling it together.

    Then.....reloads. Probably should start reloads first, since I hate them.

    Go Steyr!
     
  2. ConfusedPerson

    ConfusedPerson New Member

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    Sorry for my ignorance, but whats a B card? And yes I could google it, but wheres the fun in that! :willynilly:
     

  3. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    uspsa has different classifications for different levels of shooters. this helps shooters know where they stand amongst shooters of their own level.

    Thai is now a B level shooter which means that on average he's better than a C level shooter but not as good as an A level shooter.

    uspsa keeps track of this through classifiers which are "basic" stages at most matches. better score, better classification.

    .25 seconds on the draw doesn't really matter on a 26 round stage, (especially compared to a "failure to engage" and a handful of charlies but a lot of classifier stages will have you draw and shoot two or three rounds 6 times. .25 second x 6 turns into a second and a half, which is HUGE when you're trying to jump a class.


    as much as i enjoy ipsc shooting, i never joined uspsa and therefore am not classified myself. (i'm waiting for an ammo sponsor!) but without doubt i'm not a B class shooter.

    let's say i'm a D class shooter. Thai boxer and i could go to a match and squad up together. his times would smoke my times BUT i'm really competing against the other D class shooters, not thaiboxer.

    so congratulations thaiboxer, and fill in the blanks i'm leaving out.
     
  4. ThaiBoxer

    ThaiBoxer Active Member

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    BT nailed it. The classifier stages are mostly "stand-draw-shoot-reload-shoot", so they measure those skills. In contrast, the field courses involve quick movement, negotiating barricades, shooting moving targets, shooting from awkward positions, stage attack strategy, etc. So you can be good at the "static-like" skills in classifier (even though they aren't really static), and not place well in most matches OR do better in field courses and matches then you do on classifiers (and get called a "sandbagger"). Mostly, the skills carry over and a classifier score is a pretty accurate representation of a competitor's "ability", but no always. I was getting called a sandbagger the last few months because I was classified C, but my general placement in matches and stages was at a strong B-level or so.
     
  5. ConfusedPerson

    ConfusedPerson New Member

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    That clears it up nicely, thanks! :D

    Hope we see a "A-card en route" thread from you soon! :thumbsup:
     
  6. a468

    a468 New Member

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    Hope you bring much needed good press to our guns.

    Good luck :thumbsup:
     
  7. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    I so desperately want to start doing this....

    ...soon I hope....

    :wall:
     
  8. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    it's a blast! i gave up when i couldn't afford ammo. i kind of lost touch with my buddies from that activity.

    i recently asked them what they did about practicing now that ammo was scarce as well as expensive.

    1) they all reload and have standing orders at multiple suppliers so they never run out of components.

    no surprise there.

    2) they all practice almost exclusive with dry fire practice and airsoft.

    a lot of these guys went to the nationals only shooting about 300 live rounds a week.

    i've got a blowback airsoft gun and i'm going to try to get to a couple of matches this year. an "easy" one and a really fun/tough one.

    try it out, it's awesome! but it's just like motorcycle racing. when you go the first time, you'll see guys FLYING but you can't really do that until you've got all the basics tight.
     
  9. Doc

    Doc New Member

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    I would love to try this as well, but I have a serious time and money crunch for a while. Still, just getting out to a few here and there would be fantastic. I suppose I'll have to figure out when and where.

    BT: do the gas blowbacks actually translate well enough, given the erratic accuracy of airsoft guns in general? Or are targets usually close enough that it won't matter?
     
  10. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    well... i mean... it's not anything like live ammo. but it has an advantage over a .22 in that you can practice at home whenever you feel like it. and you can set up targets at three different distances.

    and it's got an advantage over dry fire because you can fire multiple shots at multiple targets without resetting your trigger.

    and the metal slide versions are similar weight in your hand. and you can practice drawing and reloading.

    when you shoot at home, just use an ipsc target printed on 8.5x11 paper. this will simulate distance and when you get to the range, the regulation targets look HUGE.

    downside? no steyr airsoft pistols. i use a g19. the trigger doesn't feel anything like the "real" gun. magazines are expensive, but you really only need two. durability. mines holding up okay, but it's not like i'm shooting it daily. more like monthly.

    accuracy? my g19 blowback will shoot the same hole over and over again at 7 yards.

    there's an m+p blowback that runs on c02 cartridges instead of green gas. not sure if that's a plus or minus for you.