trigger mechanism, how does it work?

Discussion in 'M, C, L and S Series' started by nuj, Sep 1, 2007.

  1. nuj

    nuj New Member

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    hello to all,
    it's been a while since a posted anything here in the forum, have been very busy late, anyway, i was wondering how the trigger mechanism work on the steyr. i once read somewhere in the forum that as you pull the trigger, the sear (the one with a triangle ) moves back and down, is that correct, please shed a little light on this one.
    if thats the case, is it posibble to remove a small amount of metal on the triangle in order for the trigger to lightened up since there be little contact point between the firing pin and the sear once it is push back and down by the trigger pull.
    has anyone tried this, just wanna know before i start doing some minor gun smithing on my precious m9a1
     
  2. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    This is definitely a Q for BigTaco or perhaps even MrA, but I'm about 99% sure you definitely don't want to do that. I would stick to polishing and MAYBE swapping some springs if you just can't stand the trigger. Why are you so eager to modify it?
     

  3. DAIadvisor

    DAIadvisor New Member

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    Yeah, definetely DO NOT grind away at the triangles on either bottom or the firing pin. If you want to make the trigger pull smoother I recommend polishing them with a dremmel type device. (again, at your own risk)

    Steyrs do not have the firing pin safety, so the last thing you want to do is to modify the only thing that prevents your gun from unintentionally going "boom".
     
  4. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    small caution.....



    DO NOT MODIFY STEYR TRIGGER MECHANISM!!!!




    my 2 cents....
     
  5. nuj

    nuj New Member

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    hello again,
    thank you very much for the advice , actually its just a thought and i m not really planning on doing the modification without first consulting you guys. you see , all i did is polish it again and again until its almost mirror like finish. come to think of it, i can already assembly and disassemble the trigger mechanism blind folded :D .
    as for why i'm so eager on modifying my trigger, well, i like the feel of a smooth trigger action and i'm still trying to figure out how the parts works . maybe you can shed some light on this subject. also,correct me if i'm wrong but did one of you guys wrote that the gun has no firing pin safety :shock: .
    the manual says it has a drop safety, so if by some bad luck i drop it on hard pavement, there won't be any BANG, right? you see i got so used to my other guns walther p99, glock, hs2000 having firing safety that it did'nt occure to me that the steyr does'nt have this very important piece of safety installed.
    well , at least now that subject is closed, all i have to do is find the spring. use see here in the philippines, gun dealers doen'st carry spare parts, only the essentials, like magazines or holsters if you can find them. still i love my steyr and i won't trade it for anything else, that's why i sold all my other guns. it totally rock, aside for the crappy trigger, i can live with it.
    thank you very mush again, hope you'll enlighten me on how the trigger mechanism work next time. take care and always shoot straight.
     
  6. DAIadvisor

    DAIadvisor New Member

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    Lack of spare parts is felt here in US as well. So don't feel too bad.

    Steyr does not have a "firing pin safety" like your Glocks, XDs, Berettas and many others have - the block that lifts up and allows the firing pin to travel forward. I believe that function is carried out by the parts in the lower receiver. Anyone with more techical knowledge please chime in. If you don't believe me, lock your slide back and move the pin with your finger back and forth - it moves freely. This said, I am not implying that Steyrs are un-safe, rather that they're built "differently" than many main-stream pistols.

    Your trigger will "break-in" as the time goes on. It will smooth out and become more manageable. About 500 rounds should do it. Also, if you haven't already - do a complete tear-down and cleaning of the pistol, including the slide to make sure all the original lubricant has been removed - that could be the cause of some of the problems you're experiencing.

    Good luck .:)
     
  7. nuj

    nuj New Member

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    your correct DAIadvisor, from what i've noticed, that part with a triangle seems to move up and down and goes straight back. still its a complicated piece of mechanism don't you think. if you can just see the trigger mechanism and the firing pin assembly of my gun, the magic mirror from snow white will die of envy, very shinny :D
    anyway thanks for the info, will keep you all posted on the developement of my trigger, maybe it will smooth out after a few hundred rounds ok.
    thank you, take care and shoot straight always
     
  8. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    The Steyrs do not have a firing pin safety, but when you rack the slide you only precock the pistol to a certain (disputed) percentage. Whatever the exact number is (the common # we toss around is 72%, but there appears to be no evidence to support this), it is a % deemed insufficient to set off all but the softest (read dangerous) primers. So in this regard, you should have little/no concern, as even if all mechanisms did fail, the firing pin should lack sufficient force to fire off the round.
     
  9. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    so... you've polished the top of the sear and the firing pin tang and the trigger still feels bad, but you're very proud of your polishing none the less.

    interesting.

    i had a really nice tutorial called "how it works" that was lost when the site was transferred.

    in a nutshell, the trigger bar pushes the sear backwards, which pushes the firing pin backwards.

    at some point, the post (#11) hits pin #14 which stops it's rearward travel.

    now, the trigger bar pushes the sear (still pushing the firing pin) off of the post at which point the sear drops down and the firing pin is allowed to travel forward.

    during the entire trigger pull, the firing pin spring is compressing on it's guide rod and the weight (#45) is sliding on this guide rod as well.

    polishing this guide rod and the inside of the weight is the A#1 way to improve trigger feel.


    also... try not to take your pistol apart more than necessary. everytime you push the pins in and out, you loosen the entire action up. once the sub-frame is removed from the frame, there is nothing that can't be done with a good solvent, an old toothbrush, HOT running water and compressed air.


    as far as being "complicated", i don't see anything to support this. it's very straight forward. no camming, no true angular/arc contacts. the triangle on the sear only exists to let the firing pin tang come forward with less downward movement of the sear. some of the surfaces are curved. but their function is straight forward.


    i recently poked my nose into an M+P and noticed that it's sear does cam into an angular contact. that's complex.

    steyr sear goes straight back and falls down out of the way. every other piece has to be there to play a supporting role. you have to have a movable post and subsequently a spring. spring #12 is my favorite spring.

    anyway... good luck. polish your firing pin spring guide rod. that'll make you much more happy with your trigger.
     
  10. heavymetalmachine

    heavymetalmachine New Member

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    ''anyway... good luck. polish your firing pin spring guide rod. that'll make you much more happy with your trigger.''


    :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  11. nuj

    nuj New Member

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    hi there bigtaco
    thank you very much for the nice info regarding on how the trigger mechanism works. as for polishing the guide rod of the spring, i haven't tried it since the metal cap that holds the spring seems to be forced fitted. i might not be able to return it to its original set up and ruined my gun in the process. like i said my friend, spare parts here in the philippines are hard to come by. :(
    still i'll do my best to remove it. if it's like a clevis pin that i can easily remove. good but if not, i'll just have to be extra careful.
    yesterday a friend of mine was asking on what type of handgun to buy, and i recommend buying a steyr. i think he saw me using it at our local range and he said its WICKEDLY COOL gun. i tend to agree. and i hope he'll go through with it. its really sad when your the only steyr in the range and the rest are 1911 and glocks. they tend to have their own world. :D
    anyway, thanks again, will keep you inform the next time i log in. be safe and always shoot straight
     
  12. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    no clevis anything.

    just a "c" clip.

    push the spring down and pull off the clip.

    remove spring. just give it a little wiggle and it'll come off.

    notice a big scratch near the small end of the rod? that scratch is causing the trigger creep.

    polish rod. no dremel!! grab it in a drill chuck and spin it slowly while working some 1000 grit paper up and down the rod.

    polish the inside and the edges of the clip. this will eliminate future scratches.

    wash all the grit away, lube it up and re-assemble

    when you put the clip back on, squeeze it with a pair of pliers to achieve a smooth, tight sliding fit.
     
  13. nuj

    nuj New Member

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    hello bigtaco,
    i already removed the spring and polished the rod last night. its not that hard but the spring in another thing, it doesn't go out easily, you have to put some muscle into it when returning and removing it. my assesment, just a small change in the trigger travel but not that big. i guess i'm off to the spring. what spring are you refering. we have two inside the trigger assembly and the firingpin spring. correct me if i'm wrong but all these springs gives tension on something either the striker or the sear.
    i wonder if all these modification will make me into a better shooter :D. hey, they say that the biggest room in the world is the room for improvement, so why not.
     
  14. DAIadvisor

    DAIadvisor New Member

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    I think I am in minority here, but I wish they would have NY 12 lbs trigger option for my Steyr. I like the extra measure of safety that comes with having to deliberately squeeze the trigger instead of it going off almost by itself. But hey, I'm just a Russian, what do I know?....... :):):) Hopefully the day will come when I can order performance upgrades and not just essential components.