That other gun in my safe....

Discussion in 'Other Handguns' started by Roger Woodbury, Dec 3, 2017.

  1. Roger Woodbury

    Roger Woodbury New Member

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    Last week I had time and opportunity to get to the range. Now this takes a bit of doing as the range I go to is the only indoor range for a long way, even though this one is fifty miles from home. But I had some errands to do in that neighborhood so I planned to shoot at least a hundred rounds that afternoon. I have been practicing my grip and stance some at home so I was really interested to see what improvement I might have, if any.

    I had a choice to make considering the time I had to play that day. Should I take the new Steyr S40, or should I take the Stoeger (Beretta) Cougar 40? I have shot the Cougar more than the Steyr but I haven't fired the Cougar for more than six months. I was really curious since I have been shooting low and to the left VERY consistently, and wanted to see what my experiments with grip might mean with that gun.

    If you haven't fired a Cougar I think you really should. I have found it to be a VERY soft shooting gun. My previous (limited) experience is with Smith & Wesson 38-caliber revolvers and most of that experience is very old. I did some shooting with a Model 67 that I had before deciding to try auto loaders which is when I bought the Cougar. I'm not cheap but do admit to being a "bottom feeder", buying a lot of stuff that others have either ignored or thrown away. I paid less than $300 for the Cougar, NEW and was amazed that it shot softly, it seemed with less flip and kick than the .38 had. I had anticipated the reverse.

    Of course it's a big gun....thick, a handful and for those with small hands perhaps not the best choice. It is also an all metal gun and with full magazine on the heavy side which probably helps with the feeling of stability and softness when fired.

    I bought the Steyr for the sights and the different design than the Cougar. It also imprints far less carried on my hip than the bigger Cougar. I was a bit concerned that it might flip and kick more than the Cougar at the range. The gun is lighter, has a polymer frame and since I decided to inventory only one caliber of pistol ammo, I got mine in 40 caliber, too. I was surprised at how soft and easy shooting the Steyr was.

    I decided to take the Cougar and shoot it for a while and was very pleased with the results.
    Most recent trip to the range had been with the Steyr and instantly I felt I shot better with it than with the Cougar, last time out. THIS time I found by my slight change in grip and stance, I did MUCH better with the Cougar. Despite its heft, the gun just feels right in my hand, and of course works flawlessly as a Beretta is expected to work. I am still shooting a tad lower than I need to, but now mostly centered. I think I'm getting better and I know that I NEED to get to the range more often, at least once a month, but twice would be better.

    So, I've got two, very soft shooting 40 caliber pistols that shoot far better than I do. But it's OK, as I know I am the weak link and I must get better because the guns are just fine, either one will do. I have a really good leather retention holster for the Steyr and just found a good bargain on eBay for the Cougar (The Barsony clip holster is too light for the Cougar). I think the next trip to the range I'll take both the Steyr and the Cougar and shoot them both to see how they compare on the same afternoon.

    I like them both!
     
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  2. DrewBone

    DrewBone Member

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    I don't own the Beretta Cougar, but I do own a SIG Arms Mauser M2 which utilizes the very same rotating bolt principle. It's chambered in .40S&W but when firing it feels like a full size all metal 9mm handgun, very pleasurable to shoot. The only complaint I've ever heard about these guns that I tend to agree with is their rather wide grip, but since I have relatively large hands I have no issues shooting it.

    As long as you keep the action properly lubricated they'll provide more use than you can muster.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    They're an interesting handgun that's only seldom seen. I've nicknamed mine the "chunky monkey", LOL.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2017
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  3. SurfGent

    SurfGent Active Member

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    Nice gun
     
  4. wbbh

    wbbh New Member

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    I have the first cousin of the Cougar, the Beretta PX4 an excellent shooting pistol. The rotary barrel systems soaks up a lot of the recoil and the grip is generous, both make them gently recoiling IMO.
     
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  5. SurfGent

    SurfGent Active Member

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    You know ive almost bought this gun a few times. But i could never get the other party to budge on price so i passed. But it sure is a nice looking pistol and as a sig and Mauser collector would go great in my collection. Ahh some day
     
  6. DrewBone

    DrewBone Member

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    SG, the pistol shown was the first of it's type that I'd ever laid eyes on, and it intrigued me when I spotted it in a pawn shop showcase. I didn't think that the price they were asking was outrageous considering it was a SIG, but not knowing anything at all about that particular model I told the gal behind the counter "I'd have to marinate on that one for a while", which is my way of saying that I need to investigate it further before either taking a pass on it or plunking down the cash. Before leaving she quoted me a $50 lower than tickeded price, which admittedly got me thinking but not enough to break my own purchasing rules.

    This particular pawn shop was one of my lesser visited destinations due to it's distance from my home, so it's not in my usual "loops", but I eventually made it back out there a month or so later, and there it was. I'd done my due diligence in regards to investigating the design, including what some considered it's shortfalls, i.e, the rear mounted safety, fat grip, relatively low mag capacity (8 rounds in 45ACP, 10 in .40S&W & 357SIG), and those features that I thought were positives such as it's rotating bolt design, it being striker fired, having replaceable frame rails, and safety features such as a trigger bar disconnector, automatic firing pin safety, and loaded chamber indicator (the latter not being a requirement for me but a feature nonetheless).

    Long story short the gal remembered me and the price she quoted me, so after that one last inspection I purchased it, paying around $420 if I remember correctly. The same model pistols had sold both above and beyond that price due to their conditions on GunStroker so I didn't feel as if the price was out of line.

    Like many of my handguns I don't shoot it too often, though certainly not out of desire, as it is one smooth and pleasurable shooter, which I'm sure you'd agree with after shooting one :)
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. MicPop

    MicPop Active Member

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    Same here, I sold/traded off a few of my Cougars and picked up a PX4 Compact Carry not too long ago(I was all about the all-metal frame but finally relented:), even though it's polymer and lighter I think it might shoot a little smoother than the Cougar does-both great pistols, ridiculously easy to maintain, fun to shot, and will eat anything...
     
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  8. SurfGent

    SurfGent Active Member

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    Ya i can't remember the ones ive seen the price. So many guns cross my path here in AZ. You can go broke if you bought every good deal that came your way in a matter of a week. I leard when i moved out here. Cause you'll buy something just cause money is burning a hole in your pocket and next day you'll come across the gem you been looking for
     
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