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MrApathy said:
your referring to the M series stock?
mdwguns and IGB of austria
you need to either register SBR or get the 16" barrel

no idea if it will work on MA1
I think he means shares of stock, MrA.

At least, that's what I got out of it.
 

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I think he was refering to stock as in wall street and investing.. LOL

thats a good question.. wonder if they are on or willing to be on nasdaq,dow,S&P or anything.... i guess the diff is, when you have shareholder you now have a PUBLIC ownership,, not really a private ownership.. kinda risky in thier buisness.

last thing ya need is some rich anti gun freaks buying up stock and shutting them down.. :)
 

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Hmmm. I figured he meant publicly traded stock in the company. In that case, it looks like Steyr is a brand now under the umbrella of CNH Global. They have ADRs traded on the NYSE, ticker CNH. The thing is, I don't know the exact relationship between the fireamrs manufacturing operation of Steyr and CNH, and CNH looks like quite a large company with many other interests. I believe they acquired the Steyr brand through agricultural interests, being that Steyr made tractors. If you're looking to invest primarily in Steyr as an arms company, I'm not exactly sure how that would work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, I meant publicly traded stock. I see great things for Steyr in the future, and I'd like to be part of it.
 

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not very many if any weapon manufacturers are privately traded. for obvious reasons.. look at winchester.. Buh BYe...
 

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Well,

From what I understand Steyr went from a government corporation in Austria to a 100% private corporation, but I do not think they are a public one that is traded on a stock exchange at this point.

CGUNS is the man to ask he knows alot about the business side of Steyr. I believe if you look there is a very old post about Steyr Mannlicher going from some type of Austrian government corporation to a strictly private corporation.
 

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ministerofdeath said:
Well,

From what I understand Steyr went from a government corporation in Austria to a 100% private corporation, but I do not think they are a public one that is traded on a stock exchange at this point.

CGUNS is the man to ask he knows alot about the business side of Steyr. I believe if you look there is a very old post about Steyr Mannlicher going from some type of Austrian government corporation to a strictly private corporation.
i think i get what your saying.. im just saying a privately owned/operated corperation is fine... such as Mr Glock.. Yet privately traded on the exchange would not be such a great idea. at leasy in my humble opinion...
 

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whoa... confusion.

a company traded on an exchange would be publicly held and publicly traded. a privately held company would not be traded. who would they trade their company with? one person or a small group of people own it in it's entirety.

the problem with publicly held companies, (which i fully understand are a tremendous part of our great capatalist system) is that the focus becomes making money, not making a product.

hypothetically...

a privately held gun company makes guns. at the end of the year everybody from the owner down to the janitor made money. they stay in business.

a publicly traded company makes guns. at the end of the year everybody from the ceo to the janitor made money. but the shareholders are unimpressed with their return on investment. a sale of the company would net the shareholders a dramatic return on investment. the company gets sold.

what really sucks is a business that thrives for a decade, then hits a downspell. this is the great opportunity to use some of the cash reserves that are sitting around from a decade of growth to rebuild the product line. but instead, shareholders vote to liquidate the company based on the recent downturn. this ends up putting fat checks into shareholders pockets (reward!) without taking the RISK of spending all the cash reserves only to confirm the business is unable to make it in the market. you can't blame them. the risk to reward ratio isn't attractive.
but it still sucks.
 

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For those of you who are wondering about the activities of a Holding company, Steyr Mannlicher as we know it is an Arms production firm. But, it is also very diverse and is active in other fields as well. Take a look at the Steyr Puch G class.
The Holding Company basically owns the assets and securities of the Steyr firearms production division, as they produce a product, along with any other firm that is under the "Steyr corporate umbrella" that produces a product or offers services for sale. The holding company will also have voting control which allows them to appoint and select who is on the board for the subsidiary firm and control the activities that the subsidiary firm carries out.
Translation: Steyr Mannlicher Holdings basically tells Steyr Mannlicher Firearms what to do, because they are in charge and control assets and voting power.
There that explains a little bit about Steyr's corporate structure. There is another post, that I'm still looking for from CGUNS about how there is something to do with Steyr going from some type of government corporate form (in Austria they do things differently) to a seperate corporate entity free from Austrian government control. Something like that anyways. I'll keep looking and post it if I find out.
 

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bigtaco said:
a publicly traded company makes guns. at the end of the year everybody from the ceo to the janitor made money. but the shareholders are unimpressed with their return on investment. a sale of the company would net the shareholders a dramatic return on investment. the company gets sold.
That only happens if the original private owners of the company are short sighted enough to put 51% or more of the company stock out in the market.

You can be publicly traded, but still retain 51% or more of the stock and you still control every aspect of the company because you have the most votes.
 
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