steyr duraility/torture tests.read please!

Discussion in 'M, C, L and S Series' started by Guest, Dec 15, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I am getting a m40 in a few weeks.I like the ergonomics,features and price but I expect alot from my handguns.I carry all the time in all weather and subject my guns to weekly shooting sessions of at least 500 rounds,expose to sweat/dirt/weather constantly.I was wanting info or testimonies on the m series durability.Anybody ever put your steyr through a torture test?Do you think my steyr will hold up to the elements and heavy firing and use?Thanks!This is my first steyr! :p
     
  2. IDPASteyr

    IDPASteyr New Member

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    I can't speak for anyone else but mine have held up just fine through the conditions you describe. Make sure you have a spare parts kit and learn how to do repairs on the gun.
     

  3. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Moderator

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    Somone needs to make a sacrifice to the Steyr Gods and torture test their M.
     
  4. Shooter

    Shooter Premium Member

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    Speaking of spare parts.......I emailed the usa/steyr and haven't gotten a reply, but are there any spare parts available yet?? and if so where do we get them......?
     
  5. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Moderator

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    But that's nothing crazy - just really excessive use. I'd like to see someone do crazy things with the M the way glock guys do - freeze it, immerse it in various fluids, drop it from airplanes, shoot it, etc.
     
  6. madecov

    madecov Active Member

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    Well, once you have yours.............tell us how it works out . You can freeze, bury, run over, and abuse your own gun. I'm not going to do stuff like that to my firearms :wink:
     
  7. FlaChef

    FlaChef Guest

    honestly I do not believe there is any way a steyr can stand up to that like a Block. They were made for that stuff.

    I'll take my better shooting, better feeling, less recoiling, and more accurate steyr for everyday carry, home def, and competition anyday, because I would not be doing that stuff to any of my pistols.

    I have dropeed one on concrete once, I have gone 800+ rounds w/out cleaning and that's all the abuse I shall give my pistols :lol:
     
  8. Shooter

    Shooter Premium Member

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    I would think a more moderate test would be sufficient.....like shooting 800-1000 rounds without cleaning, maybe dropping it in some muddy mess, or sandy envirnment and seeing if it keeps working.....everyday things like we might experience......I've heard so many stories of guys in varous training arena's dragging their bodies through grime and muck and everything from Sigs to 1911's failing to fire.....except Glocks......I'd like something like that.....simple, if I fall or drop my Steyr in muck, will it continue to shoot......I'm not going to an extreme war envirnment.......
     
  9. Ramshackle

    Ramshackle New Member

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    Every gun is prone to failure. Torture tests aside -- an advertising gimmick -- I've seen Glocks fail to extract or eject, plastic sights break, cracked slides, doubling guns, etc. That doesn't make the Glock a bad gun. All mechanical things eventually fail.

    On the other hand, the Steyr should be more durable than the Glock since the sights are metal not plastic, and the internals are mostly metal compared to the plastic used in Glocks. The barrel, slide, firing pin and recoil rod are equally durable in both guns. Glocks have the edge in the ability to be modified, but if Steyr sold only half as many guns as Glock there would be a big market in aftermarket parts.
     
  10. ministerofdeath

    ministerofdeath New Member

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    The interesting thing would be if there have been any military or law enforcement trials that have fired until failure under different conditions. Does anyone know if any police or military organization issues Steyr Pistols?
     
  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I'm new and in fact this is my first post here. That said, I have searched relatively touroughly for the answer to this question and am also interested in after-market parts. I already heard about Jack Ash, but am still unsure if he offers or recommends springs (i.e. from Wolff). Can someone please point me in the correct direction for the answers to my questions? Thanks.

    seed
     
  12. FlaChef

    FlaChef Guest

    there are no answers ATM :cry:

    you can send your gun back to steyr, but they are still trying to get liscensing to import parts for sale.

    for aftermarket springs it's trial and error, with no REAL results to date.
     
  13. Guest

    Guest Guest

    -------------A steyr forum member owns a gun shop and sells some Steyr parts, I bought my 357Sig conversion barrels for my M40 from him for $215 which included shipping. His name was Marc Wagner of MDW Guns. Great to do business with, got my barrel (dropin) in 4 days it came with a test target and shoots great.

    UTCCOP
     
  14. revjen45

    revjen45 Member

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    Just an observation- It seems like the Steyr was designed more as a cop gun than a military gun: less likely to be abused and exposed to extreme conditions or issued to ignorant beet eating conscripts who regard flush toilets as high tech. My S9 works great- I don't run over it, drop it from airplanes, soak it in camel urine, or shoot it with the muzzle immersed in mud. I'm old and fat. It's unlikely I will be emerging from a binjo ditch to slit the throat of a North Korean Marine. As a real world defense pistol it is a great choice. If it's not rugged enough for you buy a MILSURP ComBloc pistol like a Cz52, Tokarev, or Makarov. They were designed to survive being frozen in a cesspool and abused by illiterates. This is not intended as a flame- please do not take offense.
     
  15. FlaChef

    FlaChef Guest

    actually you are correct, they were designed by a cop to be a cop's gun.

    This particular cop was also a Glock employee and it was supposed to be the evolution of the glock (which was designed to be a battlefield pistol), only it didn't fit their design theory so he sold it to Steyr.
     
  16. revjen45

    revjen45 Member

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    I see the Steyr as relating to the Glock as the Luger relates to the Borchardt.