Saw a used 9mm MA1

Discussion in 'M, C, L and S Series' started by briang2ad, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. briang2ad

    briang2ad New Member

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    But.... it seemed to have a part missing at the bottom rear of the grip - there was a hole/gap there - is this nromal? Is something meant to 'go' there? Anyone have a pic of the lower rear of the mag well?

    Anything to look for in a used Steyr? Does Steyr service used guns?
     
  2. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    Nothing goes in that gap - a lot of polymer handguns have it. We used to sell grip plugs for the original M (not A1) to fill it, but it was mostly an aesthetic thing. You will run into no problems from SAI should you ever need to send it in... Their customer service is absolutely top notch.
     

  3. briang2ad

    briang2ad New Member

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    Thanks...

    But, as a PRICE consideration, would Steyr rewcognize ANY warranty on a used MA1. Also - any comparison to Glock or SW 99?
     
  4. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    Steyr will likely not ask when you bought the gun, let alone who you bought it from. Should you have trouble, they will take care of it - SAI is an awesome company that stands by their products and will make it rig. A simple search will yield pages of results on the glock vs. steyr thing - we've even had a few posts with heavy emphesis on this topic in the past week. Regarding the SW99, my only experience is with the compact .40 version (good friend has one), and I can honestly say it is probably the single worst handgun I've ever had the displeasure of shooting. Recoil is terrible (though I can't really fault the gun - compact .40's can be rough), it rarely makes it through 2 mags without at least one failure regardless of ammo or the shooter (no, seriously. I've tried to get him to sell or send in that gun so many times), and the trigger is just god-awful. S&W makes a fine wheelgun, but I'm personally planning on staying away from their semi-autos (M&P is likely an exception to this rule).
     
  5. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    Re: Thanks...

    SAI will, I repeat, WILL take care of you, should you actually need any warranty assistance... :wink: :wink:

    Yes.

    A] Very Similar.......

    B] Not even close.....

    8) 8)
     
  6. mgeoffriau

    mgeoffriau New Member

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    Some of their earlier metal frame auto's are quite nice. I've been on the lookout for a 3913 Ladysmith (or even better, the 3913NL -- a Ladysmith without the Ladysmith label) for a while now.
     
  7. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    Glock has the same gap, and aftermarket plugs to fill it.
     
  8. Netfotoj

    Netfotoj Premium Member

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    I'm surprised at that broad-brush negative comment about S&W semi-autos coming from such a knowledgeable pistol expert as you, Syntax. Obviously, you haven't shot many if any of the steel Smiths, not one of which I've shot has ever been anything short of fine pistols.

    I can't comment about the SW99, which is the Smith version of the Walther P99, or any other Smith polymer pistol, but the only problem I have with steel Smiths is I don't have enough money to buy every one I see. :mrgreen:
     
  9. BulletBait

    BulletBait New Member

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    A price under $350.

    Seriously, you can still get NEW M9A1s from CDNN for $380 + shipping and transfer fee.
     
  10. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    Perhaps I should have qualified my statement a bit more in the interests of fairness. My experience is limited to my friend's SW99c and a handful (probably 6?) of steel framed semi-auto's I've shot at the range - the whole "you can shoot mine if I can shoot yours" thing. The steel framed guns are just way too awkward for me - controls, grip girth, etc. - nothing feels right about them. Just a personal thing I guess... I have gathered from a ton of reading that my opinion is shared by quite a few others on the gun boards (perhaps it is more indicative of the fine quality of their wheelguns and less indicitive of the quality of their semi-autos?), but we all know how much that kind of anecdotal evidence can be worth :roll:. I didn't mean to imply that all S&W autos are jam-o-matics - I know of one that certainly is - but my opinion of the rest of their pistols stems from mostly personal reasons.
     
  11. ThaiBoxer

    ThaiBoxer Active Member

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    FWIW, the grip gap is also there to accept a shoulder stock. I know, it seems stupid but it is decent if you have a machine pistol and need to raid and clear a phone booth.

    And that's why we can't have pistol stocks without paying a $200 hindrance tax, getting a signed permission slip from local CLEO, and submitting fingerprints and paperwork to a partially corrupt organization like the BATFE.
     
  12. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    And that's why Revocable Living Trusts are a beautiful thing... :wink:
     
  13. Netfotoj

    Netfotoj Premium Member

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    I figured you were speaking from personal experience as you don't tend to make global statements without facts.

    I have big hands with long fingers and just love double-stack semi-autos. Even a "Block" fits my hands just fine.

    And I also like S&W semi-autos because most of them have dual decocker/safety levers, handy for this lefty.

    I also had a S&W "wheelgun," a Model 19 357 magnum, but I sold it to buy my M357-A1, so that's a great trade. It was a great shooter and my wife even liked it with .38 Specials, but it was a bit awkward for concealed carry. :D

    But that's why there's so many different guns out there, so each can have his own druthers. :mrgreen: