Safety on SA1

Discussion in 'M, C, L and S Series' started by Buzz, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. Buzz

    Buzz Premium Member

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    It is my intention to acquire a SA1 in .357 Sig a soon as possible. This will be a carry gun. For a number of reasons I very much like the manual safety that was part of the earlier M and S series. Does anyone know whether Steyr plans on making the manual safety available on US guns? I think that there would be a big market for this and a good way to pick up customers from folks who would like to own a Glock but don't due to the lack of a manual safety.

    BTW, I understand why Glock can't/won't add a manual safety (I own five Glocks) but can't see a reason why Steyr shouldn't offer them as an option to the US market.

    Buzz
     
  2. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    steyr has said the reason for the removal of the safety has to do with liability reasons.

    due to the fact that the user must put their finger in the trigger guard to deactivate it, there is potential for an accidental discharge.

    many of the members of this board have loudly made their love of the manual safety known. steyr doesn't have the greatest reputation for listening to their american customers, but if lots and lots and lots of the manual safety crowd got together, maybe you could get steyr to bring it back. it is available in other countries. it would merely have to be okayed for import by steyr.

    it is kind of a sad state of affairs when a manufacturer removes a safety device for fear of litigation.
     

  3. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    This specific matter concerning the S-A1 has been addressed with SAI and Steyr reps in Austria, and after discussing it with their American lawyer, they decided it was a definite no-go for the forseeable future.
     
  4. Buzz

    Buzz Premium Member

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    Spectacular. But, I can understand how the proximity of the safety to the trigger could give rise to a basis for claims of an AD.

    Buzz
     
  5. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    one of the tennents of good gun control (as opposed to "bad" gun control. no pun intended) is that you keep your finger out of the trigger guard until ready to fire.

    my shooting instructor always yells "index", meaning put your finger on the side of the frame anytime you're not actively shooting. this is a hard and fast rule anytime you're moving but not firing in every competition that i'm aware of. also just a sound practice. one than one person has been shot by a cop who had his/her finger in the trigger guard while running after a suspect.

    there could definitely be a situation where you would want to be ready to fire, without actually firing. a good example would be a guy who is threatening you with a knife, but not advancing towards you.

    if you were to draw the weapon, you will point the weapon at the target whether you want to or not. it will just happen.

    if at this point, you put your finger in the trigger guard to de-activate the safety, it is conceivable, you could discharge the weapon by pulling the trigger without having made a discernable effort to do so.

    unlikely? yeah but... if it can happen, it will.

    i've seen a re-designed safety that has two "wings" poking out of either side of the trigger guard. this would be much more user friendly to de-activate and could solve a little of the problem. but i suppose still isn't good enough for steyr to import this version into the states.

    ironically enough, it was this very feature that really convinced me that the steyr was the shizzy.

    however, after practicing for hours and hours over the course of weeks, i feel much better not having the safety engaged. in an actual event, i want the gun going bang as soon as possible with no runs, drips or errors.

    there were also times when i'd be shooting a defensive pistol class and forget to de-activate it. this in a controlled environment, when i knew exactly when and what i was shooting without having to pass judgement on whether or not to shoot at all. so i bagged the safety. it is NEVER to be activated. EVER. for me atleast.

    keep the trigger guard covered by a quality holster at all times. when drawn, keep your finger out of the trigger guard until ready to fire. no sweat. glock guys, double action only revolver guys and da/sa with decocker guys do it all day long.

    for a proximity comparison we can observe the 1911 safeties. the back strap safety; deactivated just by holding the gun. no trigger finger involvement. and the thumb safety; no chance of getting the thumb into the trigger.

    what i think MIGHT be neat is an "indexing" safety. one that could be operated by the trigger finger when it is in the indexed position. but this has all kinds of details to be worked out. not mechanically, but logically. and after examining logic, that whole idea might seem terrible, i just thought of it!
     
  6. Buzz

    Buzz Premium Member

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    Bigtaco, I have to agree with your assessment. To add to that, last night I was dry firing my S9 and noticed that the situation is more critical for someone with a short reach, someone with very small hands. To disengage the safety their finger may well be on the safety and trigger at the same time, in that little recess between the two.

    I suspect that I would have counseled Steyr the same as their US counsel.

    That said, I think that the addition of a manual safety of some other design as an option would do much for sales in the US market.

    Buzz
     
  7. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    I love the saftey as I can sweep it off as part of the trigger stroke. Not for short or thin fingers, but if you can make it work it is slick.