Sad Day in Amerika v2.0

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by babj615, Aug 30, 2007.

  1. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    More interesting developments from our nations school yards.....

    What are we doing here?

    Fattening up our cattle for the slaughter???

    :( :?
     
  2. QPluralisT

    QPluralisT Guest

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    Kids will be sent to school in bullet proof synthetic bubbles in 10 years at this rate. Double plus ungood as we'll say about it then.
     

  3. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    All part of continuing sheepification.
    Getting them ready to surrender to the first terrorist team that blows up a pizza parlor in the U.S.
     
  4. Dobry

    Dobry Guest

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    Absolutely unbelievable :roll:

    ... but sadly believable. :(
     
  5. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    HeHe, actually, they kinda already are....
     
  6. Dobry

    Dobry Guest

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    Santa Monica’s Franklin Elementary School, which banned tag because the principal couldn’t manage to differentiate between proper and improper play at the “it” position.

    What??!! I mean what??!! And I'm assuming the principal is probably a doctored professional educator with years of elementary education experience. :shock: :roll: :?
     
  7. heavymetalmachine

    heavymetalmachine New Member

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    They had the backpacks on the news here in tn when skool started this year.

    Someone will get rich.

    And now for no more tag. What? I mean what do we really want to teach our kids?
     
  8. Dobry

    Dobry Guest

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    I thought this was a joke... but it's seriously no joke... oh my word! :(
     
  9. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    WE,

    I repeat,

    WE,

    are responsible for what our country becomes....

    so, get out there today, and start making a difference!!!

    Seriously, you guys.....

    ...or I am going home.....


    :wink: :wink:
     
  10. Zundfolge

    Zundfolge Member

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    There are 2 main school districts that cover Colorado Springs*, Dist 11 and Dist 20 ... if your house is in Dist 20 its worth an automatic $10,000 less regardless of how nice the neighborhood is or the house itself.

    A big part of the irony is that most of the soldiers at Fort Carson have their kids in Dist 20 schools.


    *actually there are 10 that cover the entire metro area, but most of the schools are in 11 and 20
     
  11. posterboy7

    posterboy7 New Member

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    Sheepification is right.

    How are kids supposed to learn important social skills like dealing with conflict and asserting themselves?

    What they are learning is that if someone is bothering you call for help from an authority and play the victim. And we aren't even talking about bullying.

    Ridiculous.

    In kindergarten I chased the girls on the play ground and tried to kiss them. They ran away and occasionally one would let me plant one on her cheek. This is how I learned a bit about girls, and I assume the girls learned something about boys. I even scored a play date with one of the girls. Now-a-days I would be suspended or something for sexual harassment. I had no idea what sex was at that age! I did NOT go on to be a ladies' man; I did not have a teenage girlfriend, much less get her pregnant; and I have not harassed women as an adult. If kids don't learn how to interact on the playground and in school where and when are they going to learn?

    Sheesh.
     
  12. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    Absolutely Correct, PB7!!!!!!

    I have those same memories from 1st grade on up....

    Didn't have a clue about sex, much less sexual harassment.....

    No longer an education our children receive.....
     
  13. Zundfolge

    Zundfolge Member

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  14. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    Thanks for the 'heads up' Zundfolge...

    Reprint Here [in case it gets pulled...]




    Horrors! Maybe the Schools Are Working Just Fine
    by Sheldon Richman, Bonus 1995

    Most people today are convinced that the public schools are failing. Dissatisfaction with public education is at an all-time high. But have the public schools really failed? That depends on what they were originally set up to do.

    In a profound sense, the public schools are not an American institution. They were modeled on the system of public education found in authoritarian Prussia in the early 19th century. After Prussia's defeat by Napoleon in 1807, King Frederick William III reinforced the national school system set up in 1717. Children aged seven to fourteen had to attend school, and parents who did not comply could have their children taken away.

    Private schools could exist only so long as they met government standards. Teachers had to be certified, and high-school graduation examinations were necessary to enter the learned professions and the civil service. The schools imposed an official language to the prejudice of ethnic groups living in Prussia. The purpose of the system was to instill nationalism in demoralized Prussia and to train young men for the military and the bureaucracy. As the German philosopher Johann Fichte, a key influence on the system, said, "The schools must fashion the person, and fashion him in such a way that he simply cannot will otherwise than what you wish him to will."

    What does that have to do with the United States? Early in our history, education was mainly a private, free-market activity — no compulsory attendance laws, and no school taxes. That system produced the most literate, independent-thinking, self-reliant people in history.

    But not everyone was satisfied with the American way of doing things. According to John Taylor Gatto, the New York State Teacher of the Year in 1991:

    A small number of very passionate American ideological leaders visited Prussia in the first half of the 19th century; fell in love with the order, obedience and efficiency of its education system; and campaigned relentlessly thereafter to bring the Prussian vision to these shores.

    They finally succeeded early in the 20th century.

    Just as the Prussian system was intended to unify Germany, the American educators' goal was to create a national culture out of the disparate subcultures that comprised the country in that period. (Catholic immigrants were a prominent target.) "To do that," writes Gatto, "children would have to be removed from their parents and from inappropriate cultural influences."

    The modern public school curriculum comes right out of the Prussian system. Gatto says the American educationists imported three major ideas from Prussia. The first was that the purpose of state schooling was not intellectual training but the conditioning of children "to obedience, subordination and collective life." Second, whole ideas were broken into fragmented "subjects," and school days were divided into fixed periods "so that self-motivation to learn would be muted by ceaseless interruptions." Third, the state was posited as the true parent of the children.

    Over the years, various fads have seized the education bureaucrats of America, but those fads have been variations on a theme: The public schools are intended to create complacent "good citizens" — not independent thinkers — because political leaders do not like boat-rockers who question things too closely. They prefer citizens who pay their taxes on time and leave them alone to chart the course of the nation. The growth in government power since the advent of public schools is hard to ignore.

    So, judged by their purpose, how have the public schools performed?

    Not bad, really. Unlike our ancestors' private schools, the public schools produce citizens who look to government to make important decisions for them — from whether to help the poor, to what drugs to take, to how to get an education — and solve societal problems.

    In other words, the public schools are working. If we do not like what they have achieved, then we have to junk the Prussian system and move toward an education based on the American principles of free markets and individual liberty. Mere reform is not enough. We need to separate school and state. That's the only sure way to revitalize education, families, and the American spirit.

    Mr. Richman is senior editor at the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C., and the author of Separating School & State: How To Liberate America's Families , published by The Future of Freedom Foundation. This article originally appeared in The Detroit News and The Orange County Register .



    END
     
  15. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    A virtual government monolpy over education is a predictable disaster.
     
  16. Dobry

    Dobry Guest

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    Mr. Richman is definitely being wonderfully tongue-in-cheek and satirical.

    Also, for those who don't know, the Cato Institute is the Libertarian think-tank in Washington.
    I'm a member. :lol:

    Good article. :wink:
     
  17. QPluralisT

    QPluralisT Guest

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    Bullet Proof Baby is way ahead of them. :lol:

    I'll bet the guy that makes those backpacks is making a "killing" off of the very parents that forget to check their child's seat belts before they drive to/from school. "Parenting" is apparently only for those that can't shell out $175 per child.
    --------------

    Can't say I agree with the Cato Institute (on much of anything to be honest). Under CI logic, if your Volkswagen breaks down, you should throw it out, (It's a Nazi device anyhow) and go to work on a horse. After all, our ancestors did it 100 years ago and the horse isn't subject to government registration (yet). While the premise that our current educational institution is fundamentally flawed on historical ground is interesting and plausible, to say the only logical option is to take a 100 year leap back in history is inane. Interesting premise though, I will have to research the validity of this some other time.

    The world of 2007 may be a crazy one, but it is definitely better than the world of 1907.
     
  18. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    are you sure about that?????


    I mean, really, really sure?????
     
  19. QPluralisT

    QPluralisT Guest

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    In 1907,

    Women couldn't vote, King Leopold II of Belgium was just about to finish a genocide of up to 20 million Congolese a year later, life expectancy was 45 years, the world record for crossing the Atlantic by ship was 5 days, penicillin wouldn't be invented for another 21 years, pneumonia and the flu were the leading causes of death, only 8 percent of all homes in the United States had electricity. To name a few!Source

    I can't really imagine many ways in which my life isn't better than my grandparents and beyond. It's a better world, it's still terrible, but certainly better than a century ago.
     
  20. posterboy7

    posterboy7 New Member

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    I completely agree with you, QPT. I would be dead because there was no heart surgery or organ transplantation.

    And don't forget, the Colt 1911 hadn't even been designed yet. I am not sure what Steyr's 1907 catalog offered but I am sure it didn't include the M-A1!