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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
s9-a1 brass gouging

Just got my s9-a1 NIB and i noticed cycling rounds that they are being scarred heavily by the rail underneath the slide. anyone else have this issue? the brass has 2 parrellel scrapes running down from base to mouth, and it goes pretty deep too. very troublesome, haven't fired any live rounds though.
 

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Just got my s9-a1 NIB and i noticed cycling rounds that they are being scarred heavily by the rail underneath the slide. anyone else have this issue? the brass has 2 parrellel scrapes running down from base to mouth, and it goes pretty deep too. very troublesome, haven't fired any live rounds though.

Photo?

Picture is worth a thousand words, and every mobile device made in recent years has a camera built in......
 

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Can't really tell from the pics but it almost sounds like the feed lips on your magazine might be sharp and causing your issue. Load up a new mag with new unscarred rounds, then empty every bullet from it BY HAND, inspect them and tell me if you see the scars on the new rounds. I think it could be your feed lips.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
did you look at the slide picture? the inner rail looks like it has brass residue on it. the magazine lips are much wider than the scars, they line up perfectly with the inner rail under the slide.
 

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I am looking at my pistol right now and I am trying to see what you are seeing, as I could not see your pics as clear as I would have liked to. It does look like the slide guides are riding right over the round during cycling. I have not had a chance to shoot my pistol yet but I will definitly keep an eye out for this.
 

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The marks are normal. You can't press brass against a moving metal surface without some kind of marking occuring. The marking occurs on the recoil stroke of the slide. The inside edges of the rails center the sear over the post prior to resetting the striker.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
this is a serious flaw, i have NEVER heard of any other gun causing such serious gashes in the brass. maybe i am not stressing well enough how deep these scars are. my phones camera is a joke so it didn't help much taking the brass pic, but as you can see in the slide pic that was only from 3 shells! Again, these are not so much as scars as gouges.
 

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If they are that bad, take a sharpening stone and lightly smooth out the rails. Don't take a lot of metal off, just what you would after sharpening a knife to remove the fine wire on the edge.

Do the cases show any signs of potential failure after firing?
 

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If they are that bad, take a sharpening stone and lightly smooth out the rails. Don't take a lot of metal off, just what you would after sharpening a knife to remove the fine wire on the edge.

Do the cases show any signs of potential failure after firing?
I just went out of my way to try and scar the brass and it did scar the brass, but I pressed heavily on the brass against the rail and it marred the casing.

Being that the fire arm is not fired and I'm assuming you have close to a full magazine, the pressure from the spring in a new mag is going to be high enough to cause this scaring.
These pistols are built with tight tollerances.

The feed area we are talking about is going to be slightly sharp, but for it to actually damage the shell to an extent for failure, it would have to have some massive burs on it which would bite into the brass.

Now, when I first got my C9-A1, I ran about 100 rounds though it cycling the slide and left my magazines full for a day or 2 to break the mags in because they were so hard to low.

I cannot honestly remember if mine marred the brass any.

But as mentioned before.
We are taking a soft metal, brass, and pushing it against a hard metal and stoking the hard metal over the brass. It WILL cause scaring.

If you are worried about it and the groves are deeper than you feel confident with, then take a ceramic stone and hit the edges on the inside there and knock the burs down.

It is entirely possible they are sharp.

I'm not trying to call you a liar or anything.
But, the universe does weird things.

I can explain as to why these things are happening making excuses for the MFG, but, sometimes it's just something more simple than that.
 

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The gun is tight as a tick new. Mine has over 500 rounds in it and still is. My Glock doesn't do it because it's rattles like a can marbles new. Shooting the thing will correct it. On a full mag there's a good bit of pressure on the rounds against the slide.
 

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I remember that my first Steyr chewed the hell out of brass, but that tapered off after I put a good number of rounds through it. Oddly enough, my second M9A1 was never as bad as the first about that.
 

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I remember that my first Steyr chewed the hell out of brass, but that tapered off after I put a good number of rounds through it. Oddly enough, my second M9A1 was never as bad as the first about that.
Probably left over microserations from the machining process.

something a really light sanding will take care of with some high grit sand paper.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I had lasek since my last post so still haven't been able to shoot but i did VERY lightly hit it with some fine grit sand paper.
 
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