Pro Hunter SBS Replacement Stock

Discussion in 'Other Rifles' started by zonata, Apr 25, 2008.

  1. zonata

    zonata New Member

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    Has anyone replaced the synthetic stock with a custom wood stock? I have a Pro Hunter SBS in 300 Win, and I was wondering what my options were.

    And yes, I'm new to this site, and loving it!
     
  2. chris2008

    chris2008 New Member

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    I have a wood stock 308 I got from CDNN
    I don't know if they have something for the 300 Win Mag
    On mine the 243 and 7-08 and 308 fit the same stock.
    Same with 25-06 and 270 and 30-06 CDNN has stocks for this long action also.
    Give CDNN a call see what they say.

    From a lot of articles I read on the web the stock on the Pro Hunter is not that great.
    I changed mine to wood perfect fit but have not shot it yet. Wood stock is also made by Steyr.
    The original grey/black I replaced kicks like a mule contrary of the reviews I have read. By the way is the 25.6 inch HB version.
    I hope the wood stock will behave. If not there are some nice after market recoil reducer pads I will get.

    I think McMillan has a stock for Steyr but is like around $500 or more....
     

  3. Cohiba

    Cohiba New Member

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    my SBS 20" light tacticals shoot .5" groups with that shabby flexible stock so many people talk down. i would be afraid to change it to a wood stock. i might only hit the target once... :wink:
    The MC stock is a full blown heavy sniper set up w/ a HB chanel. it is not condusive to a rifle you would carry in hunting situation.
     
  4. davidhalopoff

    davidhalopoff New Member

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    FRANKENSTOCK SBS: Guaranteed perfect fix for the SBS stock- $50.00. The problem is the spacing and density of the center and lateral forearm molded stiffening ribs. I bought (4) #8 stainless machine screws with 5 nuts and 5 washers per screw. using proper sized drill, by hand or drill press, drill horizontally at the bottom of the forearm on level through other side of stock so thet you penetrate the lengthwise keel midway between the molded lateral ribs. Do this to all four voids so that you have added four laterals. Use a conical counter sink to allow the outside nut and screw head to reveal the stock. When you push the screw through the first outside hole thread two nuts and two washers(nuts sandwiched inside the washers) down to one third of the length at the head. When the screw penetrates the hole in the keel add two more nut/washer sandwiches between the side of the stock and the keel. Continue getting the screw end to the out side hole and add a nut with no washer. The four nuts threaded on the screw will be backed to the opposing sides of the inner keel and the inside of the stock. Add red locktite to the one nut on the outside of stock and tighten the screw until it is snug but no putting too much tension on the stock. Now snug the nuts and washers against the inside of the stock. you can locktite them but it is not necessary. Then back the keel with the additional two nut and washers. All the is meant to be tight enough to hold fasteners in place without changing shape of the stock and stabilize the flex of the keel with the additional laterals. Do that and it sould look like Frankenstock. Now go buy (4) two part epoxy kits of specific ABS or "plastic" epoxy and fill each void enveloping the screws and nuts. If you are using the right plastic epoxy it will be hard to manipulate and doesn't lay flat like most other resin epoxies. It will be full hard in 30 minutes- too stiff to work in 5 minutes. I used regular bondo to cover the outside counter sunk fastener ends. I used a dremel cutoff tool to remove any metal from outside fasteners that the bondo didn’t cover until the stock had a smooth finish of original stock and bondo. Sand whole stock with 150. Fit the stock so the barrel floats. I bought a round steel burr remover from Napa that cut the plastic with good control of the bit and material removal on a cordless drill. The epoxy will be hard. The stability of the stock when done will be better than a McMillan. You can now use a bipod with repeatable accuracy. off hand and bag rests will be super stable. Total time was 4 hours. I painted it with Camo Rustoleum because it is very easy to renew. I sticks well to the plastic
     
  5. swamphunter

    swamphunter New Member

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    Thanks for that, david. If you float the barrel, I think is going to be mandatory to glass bed the action to make sure it is solidly fixed to the stock.

    My barrel(s) is pretty free of the stock for most of the channel, only bedded firmly just ahead of the action, and they shoot tight ( .5 inch or better groups ).
    But I don't use a bipod. I hold the rifle or rest it in the field on something soft, just a few inches ahead of the magazine, so the weight on that side of the balance point is in my hand.

    It I am aiming quickly, as with game getting up from a bed or running, I hold the rifle far out, like a shotgun, closer to the muzzle. This is where the SBS longer forend makes sense; you can get your hand out there and still be clear of the sling swivel. On other rifles, like the Sauer, the swivel is on the end of the forend cap, or on a barrel band, so you have the entire stock to work with, and not worry about getting bitten by the recoil.
     
  6. Mad Dragon

    Mad Dragon New Member

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    I have a Steyr SBS Prohunter in 300 Win Mag. I am looking to change to a tactical style stock. Something along the lines of chassis system. Do any other manufacturers, such as Tikka or Sako line up with the action and bolt holes?
     
  7. Ronald Guidry

    Ronald Guidry New Member

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    Look at Boyd Stocks