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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my better half is getting serious about personal defense - she works late in a somewhat sketchy part of Houston. Even though she shoots the Steyr 40 like a pro, she wanted something that wouldn't make her rack a slide for a reload.

Whatta ya know, there just happened to be a Smith & Wesson model 627 N-Frame 8 round .357 Remington Mag on GB! For a bargain price of $760 too! She won the bid - ha - more like Buy It Now!

I ordered a set of reduced power springs from Wolff, and I've got the polishing tools all ready for the arrival. In addition, I purchased a set of dies from Hornady and a #6 shellholder.

We'll reload 125 gr JHP for her target and PD loads - she'll shoot the same round at all times. Good loads give 600+ ft-lbs at rather rapid departures.

Now for a good looking Galco carry purse, and she's all set! I told her not to draw, just shoot through the end, we'll get it fixed later. :)
 

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I have held and dry-fired one of Chiappa's new Rhino revolvers. It's the first revolver I've ever really wanted. They're pretty cool with the firing-from-the-bottom-chamber and the hexagonal "cylinders." From the videos I've seen, even with factory loads, the .357 doesn't kick too much firing from the bottom cylinder as it does, even with the 2" snubby. The 6" just looks mean.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree, it looks cool, I've held the medium barrel length, but never shot it. However, when my wife likes the looks of something, such as the 627, I ignore her opinion at my peril. In particular since it's her gun.

Having fired the 627, it is more than manageable for her even with 158 gr. She can hold a 3" group with the M40-A1 at 7 yards no problem, I'm dying to find out how good she'll be with the 357.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looks good!

Are you going to put optics on it? Burris and Bushnell both have some sweet pistol optics. Some people use them for pig hunting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So now my better half keeps asking, "When's it going to get here?" I think maybe she's excited, she's even speaking about guns as an investment... Ooooh I love it when she talks gunp0rn!
 

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I'm a new guy here and do not presume to preach,,,but BEWARE THE SLIPPERY SLOPE.
You guys are well rooted in the world of largely look alike , feel alike world of tactical semi-autos. I only visit this world as most of my shooting ,collecting,buying ,selling and lusting for lies in the revolver world.
O my beware. Once you start to enjoy the multi splendered diversity of the infinite world of these mechanical marvels your wallets will suffer. All the new calibers and ammo needs you have never had to consider before.
O never mind , it's futile. you've peeked thru the door, you can't be saved.


By the way , just for fun , this is the originial 627-0 when it was a big honker and 6 shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good looking gun!

I was a wheel gunner back in the late '60s - 2 1/2" Colt Python. I was afraid that I'd have trouble bringing the gun back into the US from Switzerland in '77, so like a fool I sold it. Dumb, dumb, dumb...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I love learning the mechanism of a new gun!

Yesterday with the help of the Jerry Miculek S&W Trigger Job Video I attacked the model 627. Needless to say, between 1998 and 2012 there are a few changes in the manufacturing of the N-Frame S&W.

Most notably, the parts are largely molded metal. That's not a surprise as S&W advertises that service for engineering firms. The molded parts are the trigger, the hammer, the hammer block, and the cylinder stop. Obviously with molded parts there are fewer tooling marks to remove, but the surface may not be as flat as a machined part.

It took a little over three hours of concentrated work to get everything smoothed out and reassembled. The latter cycle was interesting as the hand spring was no longer held by a pin in the trigger.

The hand is the piece of metal which rotates the cylinder when the trigger is pulled. The spring has a long end (~0.5" and a short end ~0.187") It was wrapped around a pin inserted in the hand, and the long end was held in a molded slot in the trigger. Like a fool, I failed to notice the change in manufacturing for that, and wound up having to study the trigger much longer than necessary to determine the correct reassembly. I took pictures before I disassembled it, but didn't get a picture from the correct angle to show the hand spring!

The good news is that everything went back together finally, and it's as slick as a baby's butt! As soon as the lower power mainspring from Wolff gets here, I'll install the lower power trigger reset spring and the lower power mainspring and oooooohhhhhh BABY! That will be one sweet gun!

I'll post pics following the spring replacements. :drool:
 
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