New 357sig barrels. From Ranger Point precision

Discussion in 'Industry News' started by Case, Oct 27, 2017.

  1. SteyrDire

    SteyrDire New Member

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    It doesnt have to be RPP barrels perse, and the reason for polygonal barreling is for the performance enhancement and advantage of accuracy and extra velocity without going +p

    I would go for something like an HK or Tanfoglio, both of which offer polygonal and great ergos, but steyr comes out on top over Tanfoglio or HK in the ergos and recoil control. Perhaps im wrong about the extra perfomance? Yes I would get alot of guns, metering equipment, and so forth, but im on a budget, so I have to rely on what I read. Who knows, perhaps polygonal isnt worth it.
     
  2. Case

    Case Active Member

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    I have never been a big fan of the polygonal Rifling . I prefer lands and grooves with 5 or 6 RH . I've noticed when using polygonal, The rounds come out faster but do not stabilize as efficiently. I have had a H&K USP 45 ,1911s,xd 9,40,45,357sig, Ruger p90D , All as carry guns but nothing shoot since nice as my steyrs Gb ,M,L .
    I have captured some bullets in shooting recently and I would have to say that the steyr has some Unique lands and grooves.
     

  3. SteyrDire

    SteyrDire New Member

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    Well I know this for sure, the reason why the steyr GB performs as well as it does is for two reason: It is polygonally barreled, and it is a delayed blowback. Im not sure if it helps, but the barrel is also chrome lined. I doubted I can make a delayed blowback edition of the L40/L9/L357-A1, but I think I can at least pull of polygonally barreled and chrome lined. I want to say I can get away with lead cast on a polygonal barrel if it is chrome lined. So far your the first ive heard say that polygonal barreling has a negative other then not being able to fire leadcast. I know it varies from brand to brand, but in the end it is just a pistol not a rifle.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2017
    Case likes this.
  4. Thomas

    Thomas New Member

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    Polygonal barrels (like Glock) will do fine with lead and many competitors shoot thousands of rounds per year out of them. Just scrub out the barrels afterwards or use harder cast bullets.

    No problemo.

    I like polygonals myself and can shoot nice tight groups with them.

    T
     
  5. Case

    Case Active Member

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    With this GB being a gas blowback I think that's where most of the pleasure came from from shooting that gun along with a fixed barrel. The polygonal rifling Is OK in some applications it is true if you shoot straight lead bullets it fouls up quicker. Supposedly you get more velocity due to it not having lands and grooves. The downfall to it being you do not get the same twist rate as you do in traditional rifling. And the same consistency, If you have ever shot a lot with a polygonal barrel you'll notice accuracy stars to go down the hotter and longer you shoot it with out cleaning it . The only manufacturer that I believe still offers it is glock but I believe this year they stop doing it on the gen 5? . I may be wrong. It is definitely not a plus in my book it's not something I look for in a barrel. I prefer a good cold hammer forged barrel that is Chrome lined or night-tried it all the way through.
     
    harleyman likes this.
  6. SteyrDire

    SteyrDire New Member

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    Last I remember, all glocks, HK's, EAA's, IWI, Kahr, some walthers and a few other brands still employ Polygonal. That said, I've never shot 100's of rounds at once out the same barrel just to find out. So far your the first to say that accuracy goes down, which is funny since the HK fans will say it wont, and point out the "oh so venerable mk23". It just seems like an easy way to gain a performance edge is all it is to m, at least from what I have read, not all rounds actually benefit from it. I wouldnt know since i really dont have much the interest to go through all that work.
     
    Case likes this.