Lookin at Steyr

Discussion in 'M, C, L and S Series' started by xjrat, Nov 18, 2006.

  1. xjrat

    xjrat Premium Member

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    My wife and I are in the market for a handgun. It will be our first. We have 2 rifles and a collectible Colt .38 revolver that doesn't get used much. I have a lot of shooting experience with rifles and pretty good with other handguns. But it has been awhile since I have been able to shoot newer ones. My wife has some rifle experience (M16's She's in the Air National Guard) but only one time with a handgun.
    This new gun will have to be an all around gun because it has taken me a while to save up for it, so it will be awhile before I can get another one.
    I am interested in the Steyr M-A1 in .40 I have read about them. I held one at a gun show but that is it. I want to shoot one but don't know if I will be able to before I buy. I haven't had a chance to get the wife to hold it yet so I am not sure about that aspect yet. I like the ergonomics and the feel of it I even like the sites. I need info from you guys about Steyr or what would be equivalent.
    I do have a few concerns though.
    1. My wife is small at only 5' she also has small hands. So will that be to much for her(I don't like 9mm, I would rather have .45 but I know that is out of the question). I want her to enjoy shooting as well.
    2. Reliability, Is the parts and service good. Will it last a long time How many rounds in its life. As everyone says about GLOCK you can drop it in the mud, run it over, strap dynamite to it and blow it up and it will still shoot.
    3. After market, are there accessories readily available? I like the idea of the .22lr conversion for the glock to be able to shoot inexpensive rounds just for targets. ( My wife got to shoot one like that and loved it).
    Thanks
     
  2. N24RE

    N24RE Member

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    1) If she can shoot an M16 she can shoot the Steyr no problem, my wife does. Also getting the Hogue slip on grip will help relieve the shock.

    2) Parts a a bit tough to find, but since you foiund your way here you won't have any problems. Accessories that are not Steyr specific is about all you can hope for. The new MA1 allows for any picatiny rail items to be added

    3) I don't know of a 22LR conversion, plus I am not a big fan of them. Also the cost of them is very close to a complete Walther P22 which is an EXCELLENT training pistol


    Just my 2 cents\\\

    ~SJ~
     

  3. tglahn17

    tglahn17 Member

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    Hi, xjrat,

    What's wrong with a .45? I have the M9A1 and a Smith & Wesson 1911. I don't think the 1911 recoil is that much worse than the M9A1's. Will you or your wife be carrying this piece? For a small person's carry piece, I'd recommend a single stack. I'd check out any of the new Smith & Wesson 1911s (especially the scandium alloy models for carry), Glock 36, and H&K P7M8. I know I've abrogated your sanctions against 9 mm and .45 ACP, but these are all fine guns in fine calibers. I'm recommending the Smith & Wesson 1911 over other makes because of the highly reliable external extractor on the Smith & Wesson 1911s. Also, if this gun will be the only pistol you'll have for a while, I'd save up some more if necessary to get something really nice. Good luck,

    P.S. I totally agree with N24RE. Skip the conversion kit and get a proper .22.
     
  4. FlaChef

    FlaChef Guest

    some model Ruger MkIII .22's can be had for $300 NIB or less.
    My wife Likes 9mm and .45 but does not like the .40 round at all (.40 is snappier than the .45ACP), but she absolutely LOVES her .357 revolvers.

    Gender and size do not often form good indicators of caliber preference (maybe about 60%). Only thing I will say is that a .22 or 9mm is better for training as they are less likely to produce and ingrain a flinch in ANY new pistol shooter.

    I personaly am of the 9 is fine school, but if you like bigger holes then go for it.

    Have your wife do some reading on http://www.corneredcat.com (you too, even though it is geared toward women there is almost everything a new shooter needs to know in there, such as Safety, stances, grips, etc).

    As for the lifespan of Steyrs I refer you to the "80,000 rounds" article we have under our tutorials and information section.
     
  5. N24RE

    N24RE Member

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    Also as a quick note:

    I paid $ 490 from my local dealer for my Steyr M9-A1 new in the box with 3 magazines, plus a free membership to my local shooting range.

    The Walther P22 cost me $269 brand new, about the same price as a quality conversion kit.

    Once you go Steyr you won't go for anything else!
     
  6. xjrat

    xjrat Premium Member

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    Thank you all! I took my wife to a shop this weekend and she got to hold one and LOVED the way it felt in her hand :D So I got the go ahead to buy one. Now, since this is my first handgun purchase, I live in California so I know I have to take the HSC test and wait 10 days is there any thing else I should know about?
    Also is there anyone with the M-A1 .40 with that safty in the trigger guard that drops down? I havn't seen it yet but just like the idea of it and was wondering if a little extra safty is worth it???
     
  7. Gray_Wolf

    Gray_Wolf New Member

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    I’m glad mine doesn’t have the safety (which it only prevents the trigger from being pulled; it won’t prevent the firing pin from going off if something happened…)

    IMO it’s just another part that can break, I’m not surprised Steyr removed it
     
  8. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    A Steyr in 9mm would virtually guarantee she will enjoy shooting, especially vs. the snappier .40.
    If your reluctance regarding the 9mm is based on selfdefense performance, look at the results from what may arguably be the best line of handgun cartridges, the Winchester Ranger T.
    Go to http://www.winchester.com/lawenforcemen ... ting.aspx#
    and launch the comparison tool. Compare the 147 gr. 9mm to the .40 and .45 results.
     
  9. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    i thought the trigger safety was the cat's meow when i purchased my first steyr.

    but after several sessions spent just drawing and deactivating it, i gave up on it's use. both of my steyr's have trigger safeties and neither of them are ever activated.

    as wulf said, they merely prevent the trigger from being pulled. any good holster that covers the trigger guard performs this function equally well.

    the only time either weapon leaves the holster is during a live fire situation, one in which i'm counting on the gun going bang.

    skip the safety.
     
  10. DougK

    DougK New Member

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    I carry the S-40 in my pocket when out on the ranch, I would use the pull down if the pistol had a round chambered. However I dont chamber a round when I carry the Steyr in my pocket, so I dont really use the safety.
     
  11. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    I have practiced to where I can knock off the safety without making strange or discontinuous movements. I like the design of the safety a lot.