lighter recoil spring in Glock

Discussion in 'Other Handguns' started by alex, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. alex

    alex Guest

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    I read it somewhere that a lighter recoil spring can help reduce muzzle flip. If that is true can a G22 use a 15 pound spring and a G17 use a 13 pound spring with factory ammo?
     
  2. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    I dont believe that one bit.

    I use a slightly lighter recoil spring in one of my 17's because it is MagNaPorted.... and at that only one pound lighter....

    Less recoil spring means harder/faster rear slide travel = more torsion on your wrist = more muzzle flip....
     

  3. alex

    alex Guest

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    I didn't mean standard G22 and G17. Both guns are the "c" models from the factory. So are 15 pound and 13 pound springs Ok for the G22c and G17c ?
     
  4. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    Ill do some research l8r 2nite, but both of those sound MUCH too light to me.....

    I think you will have a problem with slide not returning to battery/staying in lockup with springs that soft....

    WOLFFE makes a 'combo' kit that includes 5 or 6 different springs.... You could get one of these kits and take them to the range and give'm all a try....

    Ill post again l8r after I have done some research....
     
  5. alex

    alex Guest

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    Here is the whole story. I am new to Glock pistols. They feel very light to me (even lighter than my Steyr M40-A1 by 2 oz.) Glock does not have the recoil dampening weight to counter act muzzle flip. Then I did a lot of reading from various gun forums on the Internet. What I read was inconclusive ie., some swear by the fact that lighter spring allows the slide to go back faster and therefore release much of the backward force to torque the muzzle upward. They even said most if not all competition shooters use lighter springs with even full power loads. However, the other school said heavier springs reduce muzzle flip. So I am really confused. I have a Steyr M40-A1 and my Glock 22c with factory 17 pound spring seems to have the same amount of muzzle flip as that of the Steyr. Also my young daughter has difficulty firing my guns. So I want to do whatever possible to reduce muzzle flip, mainly for her.
     
  6. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    The "C", or compensation ports have the most affect to reduce muzzle flip.

    The recoil spring is simply about timing the pistol action.

    Too light, and slide comes back to soon, resulting in possible improper barrel lockup to slide when bullet exits, as well as a slide that will not stay in battery properly... just a pound or two less will cause the slide to drop back a tenth or two when you point the weapon straight up...

    Too heavy, and the slide doesn't come all the way back, again screwing up timing of the action, resulting in stove pipes, failures to eject, and feeding problems....

    The only thing I would recommend here is a HEAVY stainless steel rod for added weight up front.

    My Glock 17 has a Haarts Rod in it [no longer avail].... and my 19 has a new and improved idea from the Haarts rod, a Dead Bang rod....

    Best of luck!!!
     
  7. Polymer Proselyte

    Polymer Proselyte New Member

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    I changed my 17 recoil spring for a 19. It is slightly lighter but to be honest I haven't noticed the difference. I think I read about it in an article from Dave Sevigny. I think the biggest help is a good support hand grip.

    The OAP (Other Austrian Pistol) will always flip more than the Steyr due to the Steyr's lower barrel axis.

    Hope this helps, I'll have a hunt for the article too.

    PP
     
  8. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    You mean you changed the factory spring in your G17 for a 19lb spring?

    That would be 2 lbs heavier, as the G17 factory spring is 17lbs.

    :? :?
     
  9. Polymer Proselyte

    Polymer Proselyte New Member

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    Sorry, being a bit vague there.

    I changed the G17 spring for G19 spring. The G19 spring is heavier when on its G19 guide rod, but lighter when put on the longer G17 guide rod. I can't remember the figures but its only a couple of pounds difference.
     
  10. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    The G19 spring installed length is like .5" shorter than a G17 spring......

    The factory G17 spring is 17 lbs., while the G19 employs an 18 lb. spring....

    But, in the G17, the G19 spring will have a much longer [than designed] installed length....

    I suspect you have something between 17 and 18 lbs.

    How well does your slide stay in FULL BATTERY when you point the weapon toward the sky?? How much pressure required to move it downward just a tenth of an inch??

    Interesting..... I have never heard of anyone doing it this way.... so I have new things to ponder now....

    :wink: :wink:
     
  11. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    A while back I put a 2 pounds lighter spring on my 17L and it started to jam
     
  12. Shooter

    Shooter Premium Member

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    A lighter recoil spring will increase the recoil because it won't buffer the backward force of the slide. The reason you lighten up a spring is to use lighter rounds for competitions like IPSC. It can screw up the timing with standard factory loads and cause malfunctions........you don't want to do this, especially for a self defense gun.......same with increasing the spring tension.....I wouldn't mess with the spring at all unless you were reloading for "purpose specific" goals........I increased my G20 10mm spring a few pounds but that was well within the recoil perameters for a hot load...........it did however make it a bit harder to rack the slide...Compensated or not, same holds true......
    ...............That all being said one pound one way or the other probably won't affect the reliability of the gun, but Glock has done the work for you and why mess with perfection....... :wink:
     
  13. alex

    alex Guest

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    ...............That all being said one pound one way or the other probably won't affect the reliability of the gun, but Glock has done the work for you and why mess with perfection.......

    One thing I don't understand is how can there be only two different poundages of springs i.e., 17# and 18# for all Glock regardless of calibers.

    If more powerful calibers require heavier springs then why a Glock 22 (.40S&W) uses the same 17# spring as the Glock 17 (9mm)? And a Glock 20 (10mm) and Glock 21 (.45ACP) use the same 18# spring.

    "Jack of all trades but master of none." So my theory is yes both the 9mm and .40S&W use the same 17# spring and they work but neither is optimized to true "Glock Perfection".
     
  14. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    Weigh the slides from each and I think you will find your answer.....

    :think: :think:
     
  15. Netfotoj

    Netfotoj Premium Member

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    Re:

    I've been poking around lately looking for a G17L or a G34 in my quest for a long-barrel 9mm and haven't found either. I don't suppose you have a reliable source for 17Ls? Or G34s? :mrgreen:
     
  16. Shooter

    Shooter Premium Member

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    Weigh the slides from each and I think you will find your answer.....

    :think: :think:[/quote]


    good answer.........expanded I would think the heavier slide of a 20/21 counters the need for a heavier spring since that would buffer some of the recoil......... :think: I presume, that is the reason the G34-5's have excess metal cut out of the top of the slide......cut down on weight vs cycling.............