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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a little trading this week. I had three bolt rifles (Savage and Remington) that I had restored and were extraneous, mostly trading fodder. I decided to deal them. When the shop made their offer I suddenly had enough for a new Kimber 84M LPT (Light Police Tactical) in .308 and a Leupold VX-II 4-12 x 40 with parallax adjustment and a set of Warne Tactical rings. Knowing that Kimber made their reputation on rifles, and having seen the wonderful Kimber target rifles at the CMP, I did the deal. The Kimber retails for $1476 and I got it for a penny under a grand. I didn’t really need another .308, but this one called out to me.

With the Kimber you have a match trigger and chamber, 24 inch heavy sporter fluted barrel, pillared and glass bedded wood black epoxy coated stock with textured stippling sculpted for a right handed shooter, a very secure piccatiny rail, and a conical sniper style bolt handle. With a lot of hand fitting and outstanding finish it’s quite a rifle. Weighing in at just over eight pounds that compares favorably to my Savage 10FP which comes in just about at eleven pounds. It is said to be a light and fast handling rifle. For a bolt rifle it’s outside of my usual price range with most of my bolt guns in the $500 to $800 range, but this was trade money and that’s when I tend to push the envelope a bit.

Opinions on these rifles seem to vary with the usual guys who have never shot one who wouldn’t own one (or question the price/value compared to other rifles) to guys that have them and love them or had one and regret selling it. There are also the guys who say that for the money they would rather do a Rem 700 build that would end up setting them back $2500. In fairness I think that at the nearly $1500 retail it might well be worth it to go with the Rem 700 build, but at the real street price of a grand I think that the rifle offers a lot.

There are also questions about out-of-the-box accuracy compared to much lesser priced Remington or Savage. It seems that those two brands will perform as well or better with a wider range of ammo, but the Kimber seems to really sing with specific factory ammo as well as handloads. That’s fine by me as I try and match a gun to a particular ammo, and handload, as will soon be getting back into reloading. Right off the bat I have had Black Hills 168 gr. Match Boat-tail recommended to me.

Does anyone else have or had a Kimber 84M, and what did you think of it? If you found a factory ammo that the rifle did very well with, or a handload, I’d really appreciate any info that you could offer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Since there were no comments about this rifle I’ll offer my own in the form of a short range report. I shot it for the first time Wednesday and this one is a keeper. Topped with a Leupold VX-II 4-12 x 40 scope and Warne Tactical rings I passed sixty rounds of .308 through it, 40 rounds of American Eagle 150 grain FMJ boat-tail and Winchester X 150 grain Power Point. Neither ammo is my choice but it was what I had on hand. All shots were at 90 yards, the limit of the range. A Caldwell Rock Delux front rifle rest was used with the rifle shouldered with no rear sand bag. I do have a Lead Sled but I far prefer to be more hands on with a rifle as opposed to locking it into a solid shooting position and merely pulling the trigger.

I started out with the less expensive American Eagle to zero the rifle. The first shot was way off paper about three feet high and a foot and a half to the left. I had installed Stoney Point target knobs (which allows adjustment without removing the cap) and my job of laser bore sighting was miserable. Plus, I had installed the Stoney Point elevation knob incorrectly so that I was out at the end of my range and couldn’t lower the elevation enough, so the knob came off for now. There is a trick to using these target knobs so that you start out in the middle of the adjustment range. With the target knob off I was able to quickly bring my shots down onto paper. The windage adjustment was fine with the Stoney Point knob remaining. I was close in on the bull in seven shots and right on in ten.

The gun is light at just over eight pounds. Add to that the scope and steel rings and it’s probably approaching nine pounds, which is still quite light. I had wondered how the recoil would be with such a light rifle, but it was no worse than any other .308 I have shot. The standard Pachmayr Decelerator pad must help quite a bit. Initial groups with the American Eagle ranged from maybe 1.25 inches to just over two inches. Not good at all, but this was a new rifle and I was just starting to work with it. The trigger is at the factory setting which is 3-3.5 lbs.. I believe that it is adjustable down to two pounds. The pull was light and crisp. I might lighten it just a bit. I would put it on par with my Savage 12 VLP and Savage 10FP which do seem to be a bit lighter. I think that if the Kimber’s trigger was lightened just a bit it would be preferable over the Savages, but that would be a close call. With a handful of American Eagle rounds left I switched to the Winchester X Power Points. The groups immediately tightened to the one inch range. This ammo had a very different feel to it (report and recoil) and really improved the accuracy of the rifle. By the last three groups of that ammo I was down to putting three shot into just over .5 inches, and the last group was just hair sub of one-half inch. I was shooting at 1.25” red target dots and those groups centered over the dot was a very welcome sight.

Just to make sure the improvement wasn’t due shooting time on the rifle I went back and shot the remaining American Eagle. Groups went back out to just over an inch. What I saw with the ammo difference is consistent with what I have read about this rifle. Some folks say that the accuracy between rifles is hit or miss. I suspect that the difference may be more between shooters and the ammo that they use rather than the rifle itself. Others have said that this rifle really sings with the right ammo. A Savage or Remington may be more consistently accurate with a wider range of ammo, but the Kimber seems to be more dependent upon finding the right ammo. While neither of the ammos that I was shooting are premium, the difference between the two was glaringly apparent which leads me to believe that the right ammo is going to take this rifle into a different class. This will be a rifle to handload for.

BTW, a note about the Leupold scope. This one has a parallax adjustment ring on the front bell. The gentleman who sold me the scope told me that I would love it. He was right. Once When I cranked up the scope to 12 magnification there was a lot of shimmer (95 degree heat) and the image dulled and was less sharp as one would expect at max. Once I dialed the parallax into 90 yards it was like flipping a switch. The shimmer was gone, the picture brighter, and a super sharp image.

Overall the rifle is beautifully built. All of that hand fitting shows. Some say that at a retail of $1476 (I paid a penny under a grand, trade money) one might as well build something on a Rem 700, but this rifle has everything that I need in one package out of the box and has shown its potential for performance. Yesterday I acquired a Harris bipod and ordered an Accu-Shot rear monopod. This rifle deserves it.

You will read varying comments about this rifle on the Internet. Yesterday’s initial range session has given me a good bit of insight as to the variance of opinions. This rifle isn’t shake-n-bake, and a little effort matching ammo to rifle to shooter will be rewarded. I’d bet dollars to donuts on that.

A photo of the rifle will follow.
 

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Well written Buzz, however,

:worthless:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree, ya gotsta have pics! I'll have pics up on Monday hopefully with the rifle fitted with its new Accu-Shot monopod.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·


Here's the finished rifle:

Leupold 4-12 x 40 with parallax adjustment
Butler Creek flip-up covers
Warne Tactical steel rings
Mounting Solutions Plus anti-cant device (on scope tube behind back ring)
Stoney Point traget knobs
Harris 6-9 bipod
Accu-Shot monopod

The only change I can see is going to a better scope some time down the road, and possibly better rings, although the Warne Tactical seem up to the job. There is absolutely no need to upgrade the stock. The epoxy coated stippled laminated stock has a high comb offering a perfect check-weld right along my jaw-line with medium rings. This stock is rock solid and the barrel fully floated, not to mention aluminum pillared and glass bedded. Being scultped for a right-hander it's an ergonomic dleight for me. A buddy of mine picked it up and I had a hard time getting him to put it down.

Total cost of rifle as shown: $1735. It adds up after the $1000 price of admission ($1476 retail).

My Savage 10FP will be identically outfitted except has a Bell & Carlson stock, EGW picatinny rail, and wears Burris Ezee QD rings. The two rifles, both 308 and designed for the same general purpose, will go head-to-head.
 

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Now that's what we LIKE! Real honest to goodness GUN P0RN! :drool: :drool: :drool:
 
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