Intoxicated at the range

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Buzz, Apr 23, 2007.

  1. Buzz

    Buzz Premium Member

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    Yesterday I was at a range that I do not frequent buying a Walther P99c QA. The range is a pretty good drive and there are others closer, but they had the gun that I was looking for. While there two guys struck up a conversation with me regarding the Walther. One of them had the heavy smell of alochol about him and was, I would strongly guess, in no condition to drive. His buddy was signing them up to shoot at the range but the intoxicated guy had no interaction with the range staff so his condition was unknown to them. Just as they were about to go shoot the one guys cell phone rang and they had to leave before a lane opened up for them.

    Before the phone rang I was left with the predicament of what to do about the intoxicated guy. I have absolutely nothing against alcohol. I enjoy a drink. As Sinatra said "I don't drink a lot, but I don't drink a little, either." But, there is a time and a place for everything and guns and alcohol don't mix unless the ammo is locked away. The thought of an intoxicated individual shooting in a very crowded range made my skin crawl. This guy was intoxicated to the point of slurring and the smell was heavy on him. I had decided to alert the range staff to his condition before they entered the range but the phone rang saving me from that task.

    Yes, I understand that the duty was on the range to handle the matter in the first place. But, the place was crazy busy and this guy slipped through and was about to be a possible tragedy for one or more people. Add to that the fact that these guys knew nothing about shooting and I saw a recipe for disaster. I think that it would have been reasonable to alert the range staff to the situation so that they could have handled it. There was at least one police officer behind the counter working and I know that she could have assessed the situation very quickly.

    Opinions?

    Buzz
     
  2. Angel

    Angel Guest

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    you should have let them know regardless cause they might have came back 10 minutes later. I think we all have the obligation to speak up if it may mean the end of human lives.
     

  3. babj615

    babj615 Premium Member

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    ABSOLUTELY let the range master know IMMEDIATELY!!!!

    Every Time!!!!!

    I have seen incidents like this, even worse actually....

    ...a bunch of young asian kids clearly shooting for the first time... carrying on and laughing at each others shots... and one of them, laughing and carrying on, turned 180 to say something in a language I dont speak to another in his group, all the while shaking/waving his weapon [rented] about the range and everyone in it....

    ..I personally dont like looking down the business end of any weapon, especially when the person possessing said weapon is not of clear mind....

    I notified the Range master immediately, and they were removed....

    SAFETY is PARAMOUNT!!!!!
     
  4. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    I agree - you should have said something regardless in case they were to come back later...

    Seems like it's the people working the counter at the range I go to that wreak of alcohol. The alternative is a place in downtown Dallas that has an all ***hole-mall-ninja staff and you're sharing the range with a bunch of crackheads that smell like weed. :shock: The indoor ranges around here are colorful, to say the least. :)
     
  5. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    I would say something to the staff but I would not accuse. That is, I would say to the staff that it seemed to you that there was the smell of alcohol and what you thought was slurred speech; and tell them that they should take a close look at them (had they stayed) or if they return. That way you are covered and you impart information that leaves the course of action to the responsible parties running the range.
     
  6. Netfotoj

    Netfotoj Premium Member

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    Absolutely you have a duty to speak up.

    Would you not report a drunk driver who was weaving all over the highway and running other drivers off the road?

    I would hazard to say a drunk with a pistol on a crowded range is at least as bad if not worse than a drunk driver.

    Nobody likes a busy body, but sometimes you just have to speak up and let the chips fall where they may.

    I've done stupid stuff in my life, such as shooting when drunk or even worse, high on drugs, but those days are far behind me. It would have sobered me up sooner if somebody had blown the whistle and got me locked up.
     
  7. Wulf

    Wulf Premium Member

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    Dayam! :shock:

    Way I see it, with a cop behind the counter, it'd be a good opportunity to walk up and ask, point blank, "How much is the reward for turnin' in a drunk shooter at the this range?", before havin' some inebriat loadin' up and goin' hot. <shrug> Just my humble opinion. :roll: Course, I can go one better, story-tellin'-wise. I was in Denver, standin' in line at an indoor range, a 4-party group in front of me and a blind guy with a cane in front of them! :shock: No sh*t! :roll: Since the line was gettin' a bit long, another employee walked up and asked if he could help me and I said sure. The facility had a general public indoor range and a private range and the guy asked me where I wanted to be stationed and I told him, "On the other side of those guys, as far away from the blind guy as I can get!" :shock:

    Wulf <-- collects the reward and meets all his Steyrclub Bros in Rocky Point for a few Caronas an' tequillas 8)
     
  8. SELFDEFENSE

    SELFDEFENSE Premium Member

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    Pretty spooky if the blind guy filled up the X-ring :shock:
    Braille targets and a veeerrrrrrry long cane?
     
  9. posterboy7

    posterboy7 New Member

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    Didn't Texas pass a law, or try to, that allowed blind people to hunt? No pun intended, but I don't see the point of hunting when you are blind. So a friend aims the gun for you while you hold it and then he tells you when to pull the trigger... Is that satisfying?

    Anyway, Syntax and the rest, you guys make me appreicate my local indoor range. Its close and I have never seen anyone doing anything that even remotely concerned me, much less seen an impaired shooter.

    Now, off the range, that is a different story. The dude next door was messing with his AK while very drunk and "dropped it". The gun goes off, the muzzle blast burns his girlfirend's forearm and he takes a bullet through the neck. The bullet passes though him, through the door jam, through the interior wall in the next room and through the outer wall and out into the neighborhood. Our houses are about 10 ft apart. Good thing it didn't come my way. Dude runs to the police station on the corner and finds two cops standing outside the police station. Lucky bastard lives. I have never seen police officers standing on that corner, never. Guy moves to another place in town, then eventually moves to Florida (watch out!). I learned later for the girlfriend's exhusband's coworker that dude left a homemade bomb in the rental which had to be removed by the bomb squad.
     
  10. Shooter

    Shooter Premium Member

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    Where I used to shoot indoors, nobody gets to shoot without talking to the guy behind the counter.I would hope that anyone shooting at a range would get a quick "check" from the folks behind the counter. .....Some kind of interaction to check out the customer. Breathe, eye contact, speech.......all would have given these guys warning of potential problems...........then he gets the "86"..........and out the door............ :|

    Posterboy, did you say you lived in Indiana ??? What town, I don't want to live there......I think Florida is safer, or was safer till your neighbor gets here....... :lol:
     
  11. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    This legislation was aimed at people with severely impaired vision, though it does not exclude the completely blind. In either event, the blind person is suppose to aim the rifle themselves with the guidance of a person gifted with sight. I see no reason why people with severely impaired vision should not be allowed to experience the thrill of hunting :?: :?... It might not seem like a big deal to you, but I imagine the experience may be quite an accomplishment for someone who just "knew" 5 years ago that they would never be able to hunt like a normal person.
     
  12. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    being a pretty avid hunter, i can say that most of "hunting" is sitting in the cold, dark, lonely woods. truly enjoyable for some. others... not so much. plenty of people go every year and get skunked!! but they still go.

    maybe, for the impaired as well as the sighted, it's not about the actual hunting. just being in the woods. man, in his predator role. i get into the muddy trucks, the cb radios and the dog box full of beagles myself. i let the little animals walk so they'll be big next year, but still enjoy a good .30 caliber exit wound!!!

    as long as someone that can see is there to keep an eye on the impaired hunter (pun intended), why not let 'em get out of the house, out of the wife's hair, someplace where you fit right in with fox urine on your boots!!!


    edited to add: i aint going on no drunk range!!! i mean, if you went to elementary school with the people fine... but a stranger!!! i'd have said something. but i am kinda surprised that this actually almost happened. seems like others would have noticed too. surprised that no one esle said anything.
     
  13. Buzz

    Buzz Premium Member

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    I hadn't thoguht about informing the range in case the guys came back to shoot after I'd left. Good suggestion.

    Overall I think that my question was more of a rhetorical one looking for some insight as to how to handle the situation, which i have received. Thanks!

    Now, situation 2. It is an outdoor public range operated by the Division of Natural Resources and there is no range master. Call the police?

    Buzz
     
  14. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    step 1) leave!!! take all the people you like with you. maybe make some new friends and take them too.

    sure, call the police. protect and serve, right? you can even tell them that you "think" there's an intoxicated person at the range. then let them decide.

    i got pulled over one night for suspected dui. apparently i was weaving all over the place!!! my contacts were dryer than a bag of sand and it was all i could do to keep my eyes open. deciding that i wasn't drunk, rather in need of some precious fluid, he kindly suggested i weave on over to a convenience store and buy some saline.

    if he's fine, the officer will be fine. if he's not fine, he'll be fined!! or locked up or whatever.
     
  15. posterboy7

    posterboy7 New Member

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    Syntax and Big Taco, you make good points about sight impaired hunters, especially the point about getting outdoors. Thanks for helping me see the light. Pun intended.
     
  16. posterboy7

    posterboy7 New Member

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    I once went to a public outdoor range in a state park in PA with my friend and my partner. We were the only ones except for the park ranger. The ranger said we were limited to five rounds in our magazines (we all had 9mm pistols) and talked about how the people with assault rifles had been bothering nearby residents with their banging away in long chains of shots and that the park was thinking about closing the range because of all the complaints. He made us feel like we were in the wrong just by being there.

    So the ranger drives off and my friend and I start shooting. The ranger immediately roars up in his truck and jumps out and says he just heard more than five shots. I told him that he heard more than five shots because two of us were firing at once. That satisfied him but we soon packed it up and left. It just wasn't worth the aggravation.
     
  17. DocChronos

    DocChronos Premium Member

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    Posted by BigTaco:

     
  18. Netfotoj

    Netfotoj Premium Member

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    I think one of the most valuable lessons I've ever learned was acquired by myself, sitting in the woods quietly.

    I would hit the woods as soon as I got home every day during hunting season, just for the pleasure of being there as much as the chance to kill something. But I never could seem to "walk up on" a squirrel with my .22 rifle.

    I commented about that to my dad and he chuckled, then explained to me the concept of "still hunting."

    Just like it sounds, you hunt squirrels by finding a good spot and sitting still. Don't move a muscle, don't even blink if you can help it. After slightly longer than forever, the birds begin to chirp again and sooner or later, the squirrels will come out and resume feeding. If you're very patient and don't move too soon, you might get a shot.

    I never bagged very many squirrels, but I did learn how to sit still and be quiet. And all of nature opened up around me and I learned more about God's wonderful creation than I ever saw or heard while walking around.

    "Be still and know that I am God."
     
  19. squirrelpotpie

    squirrelpotpie Premium Member

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    thanks for sharing that, Netfoto.
    takes me back to when i was 12 and wandering around the woods near the farm with my .410 and pausing to listen for squirrels....used to make little chirping noises with my tongue against the roof of my mouth trying to get em to come around to my side of a tree, didn't work too often but every once in a while one would be curious enough to pop around.


    as far as intoxicated people at an outside range,
    the advice given so far about giving em a wide berth or letting somebody know sounds pretty good. the only thing i might do before calling a cop though is try talking to 'em myself. course every situation is different and if they seemed belligerent at all i wouldn't bother trying to talk to them.
     
  20. Syntax360

    Syntax360 Premium Member

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    I'm not sure I would try to talk to them. It seems like a lot of people get some sort of macho-emotional-charge at the range, almost as though it were a sporting event, etc. That, combined with alcohol and live rounds, just doesn't seem to me like a great recipe for a calm, rational resolution.

    But hey - I suppose I could see it working the other way and somehow embarassing them off the range...