Funky One

Discussion in 'Anything Else' started by Buzz, Nov 2, 2007.

  1. Buzz

    Buzz Premium Member

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    So there I was, minding my own business while my buddy was buying a drum for his MP5, when I looked down into the case and spied the long snout of an old Astra. I have long wanted a full size Astra 400, but the abbreviated snout of the 3000 was still a dead give away. The 3000 is the updated shorter version of the 9mm Astra 400 (from 9mm Steyr to Luger to .380 and others all out of the same barrel) with a a barrel about an inch shorter. This .32 ACP 3000 turns out to be in amazingly good condition and actually has a lot of features more modern that its 1948 to 1956 origins.

    Anyone have any experiences with the Astra 300/400/6000/3000/4000 series pistols? I'm liking this one a lot and hope to find a 400 someday soon.

    Just took some pics: [​IMG]

    Buzz
     
  2. Netfotoj

    Netfotoj Premium Member

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    Mercy, Buzz, that's an ugly, mean-looking little rascal! Probably pocket-pistol size, if I recall the last time I saw one. :mrgreen:

    And if I remember my pistol manufacturers correctly, it's another Spanish make, like your Llama, isn't it?
     

  3. Buzz

    Buzz Premium Member

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    It's a good bit larger than a PPK. The height is just a hair under 4 inches. Total length is right at six inches. It's a little brute. When viewed from the top one can really see how stout a gun it is. It has a Sci-fi quality to it, sort of Blade Runner meets Star Wars goes to Dune. The finish on this gun, obviously original, is in wonderful condition.

    It is indeed Spanish. It's origins goes back to the Astra M1921 (400) which served wih the Spanish Army and on both sides of the revolution and with the Germans in WWII with the 600. This is the postwar version that was significantly updated.

    I have a real weakness for early to mid Twentieth Century small autos like this gun and the Berettas 1921, 1934/35 and small Walthers.

    Buzz
     
  4. Buzz

    Buzz Premium Member

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    After cleaning up the gun (little was needed) I spent a good amount of time handling it and dry firing (snap caps most defintely for a gun that age) and the trigger is very, very nice. It was funny, I had first seen the gun the day before and came back for it a day later, and knowing the caliber and the age I brought a .32 ACP snap cap with me. I asked to owner if I could dry fire the gun, as I always do, and I said that considering the age of the gun that I intended to use a snap cap to protect the firing pin from breakage. I handed him the snap cap so that he could confirm that it wasn't a live round, and proceeded to dry fire. The guy was amazed that I would have thought to bring a cap with me. It kinda makes sense if you think about it.

    The gun is beautifully crafted. It shows much of the styling from that era when tools were made with an artistic flair as a sign of pride in craftsmanship. I recall as a yute spending hours looking at my grandfather's tools from the 20's, 30's and 40's marvelling at the incredible craftsmanship that went into their creation with engraved scrolls and whirls and very artistic shapes incorporated into working tools. This gun has much of that from the scooped out recesses at the rear of the slide to the thin channel that runs down the top of the slide directing your eye right to the sight blade (actually quite ingenous and effective). This type of thing is similar to what I see and appreciate in the frame of the MA1 where obvious care has ben taken to create an aesthetically pleasing form. While some people look at the Astra and Steyr as ugly guns I see a beauty, defined by use, that sugests the level and pride in craftsmanship that's involved. With the Astra the Art Deco influence is very strong, or even Raymond Lowey.

    While my first love is modern semi-autos, I think that there might be something to find in the guns lf earlier last century. The Steyr M1912 is really calling out to me.

    Buzz