break in

Discussion in 'Other Rifles' started by GTrain, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. GTrain

    GTrain Guest

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    i just recieved my new prohunter SS in 30-06 and want to know what the best way to break in the barrel for optimum accuracy? also what grain bullet is best for break in process? i have heard that heavier grain is best for break in but im not sure. I have also heard that to shoot one round then clean, one round and clean and so on for 10 rounds. then 2-3 rounds and clean for about 20 more rounds. then 10 rounds and clean until i have shot about 100 rounds total. i looked in the handbook for the gun but it didnt say anything for break-in. i want this gun to be perfect and if it doesnt shoot tight groups then i only have myself to blame. also i understand that the break in process is to pretty much polish the barrel so if that is true could i use a good metal or bore polish to speed up the process?? please give me any advice as possible. i want to shoot it soooo bad but want to find out whats best first.
    one more thing is there any cleaning solvents that are better then others.... i usually use hoppes #9 solvent for my other guns and just bought a bottle of hoppes "benchrest" solvent also. sorry one more thing.... i picked up a bottle of corrosionX for guns and it looks like a good product but also a product called moly-fusion.....it almost sounds too good to be true..here is a link to its site....please let me know what you think.

    http://www.shootersolutions.com/molyfusion1.html
     
  2. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    well, HE and it's obviously one person, makes it sound great!!! i know that moly will chemically bond with steel. good welding practice would be to grind down any area that's been exposed to moly before welding. this because the moly in the steel can change the alloy. enough to matter?

    sounds like he's developed a way to expose steel to moly without using sulfer as a vehicle. possible? sure. useful? i guess anywhere you want moly, but not grease. sounds neat.

    am i putting it on my guns? not yet. gonna wait and see how others fair with this product first.

    but rifle break-in.

    what you posted about 1 round at a time, clean blahblahblah is exactly what i've always been told to do. by lots of people, many who shoot little tiny groups at 600 yards.

    you're basically using pressurized copper to "lap in" and fill the pores in the barrel. you clean because you do not want to pound burnt powder into your new barrel. any cleaner will do, including hoppe's no.9. you're not trying to get the copper out, you're trying to remove the abrasive powder. ask around, different people have different theories on times for removing copper fouling.

    defiinitely do not use any sort of polishing compound!!! rifle barrels are machined to tenths (.0001") and are within millionths of whatever they are. for instance, if you're .30 barrel is .3001", it won't vary from the .0001" more than microscopicly through it's length. polishing compound can easily abrade .00005" (half of a tenth) deep.

    do exactly what you said and you'll have a great rifle.

    keep all your brass!!! the best accuracy comes from handloads using cases that are already "sized by pressurized expansion" to fit your chamber EXACTLY!!! neck size them only!
     

  3. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    didn't answer the question about bullet grain for break-in.

    the thing about using bigger grains for break-in is that they are GENERALLY longer than smaller grain bullets. longer would be better for break-in for one prime reason.

    in the chamber, that bullet is sitting just off the rifling. the first thing the bullet does during it's travel is jump from the crimp in the neck to the rifling. less distance for the "jump" means a smoother transition to rifling, means less energy "pounding" on the begining of the rifling.

    too much gap, and the bullet can actually get a little crooked before engaging the rifling, which corrects the crookedness, but the bullet is pounding on the begining of the rifling.

    keep in mind that 30-06 goes from 120-220 grain. could probably go lower and higher if you wanted.

    but i LOVE 168gr. boattails in 30-06. this would be plenty of grain for me, depending on the oal of the cartridge, which would be most important in relation to the depth of your chamber.

    did this break-in with a weatherby vanguard. when i practice... (which is how all great boasts start), IT will routinely shoot under an inch. i've shoot numerous three shot groups where all holes were touching, and even shot the same bullet hole three times on one clandestine day.
     
  4. spawr

    spawr Guest

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    I just found this post and have a brand new Pro Hunter. I didn't read the break-in instructions before I pumped around 70 rounds through my new rifle. This is my first rifle in a LOT of years and didn't have the benefit of good guidence prior to shooting. Did I somehow compromise the accuracry of the rifle by not cleaning between a certain number of shots? If so, is there a way to correct this?

    By the way, this thing is damned accurate!
     
  5. GTrain

    GTrain Guest

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    As long as you didnt go crazy and shoot alot of consecutive rounds to really heat up the barrel, you will most likely be ok. like you i have just bought a new prohunter in 30-06 and i want to make sure i do everything i need to, to make sure that my rifle performs to its best. Some people that i have talked to have said that it really isnt necessary to break in a barrel on a high quality firearm,ie: steyr. but i am not going to take any chances. Break in or not it all comes down to this.....Is it Accurate? if it is, and by what you said it sounds so, then your just fine. By the way what kind of groups are you getting with your rifle, what caliber is yours and what scope and mount set up are you using???? I have had my rifle for about two weeks now and havent shot it yet.....tomorrow will be my first day in the range....I cant wait.
     
  6. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    yeah... let's have some steyr rifle range reports!!!

    i wouldn't worry about the barrel. it'll be fine.

    some of this break-in stuff is kinda silly. but hey... it isn't going to hurt either.

    i'd expect sub M.O.A. groups from the steyrs. they've been at this rifle business long enough to have all the intricacies sorted out.
     
  7. GTrain

    GTrain Guest

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    Range report will be coming soon.
     
  8. 8472

    8472 New Member

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  9. Cohiba

    Cohiba Guest

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    Break IN BS!!!
    #1 its a poly rifled CHB BBL its as smooth as its ever going to get.
    #2 the bullet always starts at the throat how are you going to smooth it al the way to the muzzle if the rough areas a stripping off copper from the time it leaves the chamber?
    imagine for a second that you are waxing your car with paste wax. ill give you all the wax you want but you must start at the gas cap every time you apply more wax.
    how in the hell are you gonna smooth al the way to the other end?
    all "break in" does is burn up the throat early so you can buy another bbl or rifle.
     
  10. bigtaco

    bigtaco Active Member

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    i'll agree that a lot of the concern about the break-in is BS. and said as much to spawr who was concerned about having ruined his rifle.

    i'll agree with your wax logic...to a certain extent.

    i think you're forgetting about pressure. and i think you're forgetting about porosity.

    if you drilled a hole in the hood of your car, started at the trunk with a handful of wax, and drug the edge of your vertical hand all the way from the end of the trunk... up and over the roof, and then slide your wax filled hand over the hole in the hood, i'll bet you'll see a tremenous glob of wax goes into the hole. if you put 40,000 psi in your handful of wax, you'll blow a pint of wax through that hole. and you'll have the wax when you get there because when you were sliding on smooth paint, there was no where else for the wax to go. IF you could seal the pressure.




    even forgetting that... when waxing a car, ever had to open the hood to get the wax off the edges? that's one big pore. ever "discovered" paint chips after waxing a car? where the paint is dinged in, but still adhered. you push a little wax down in that ding and all the sudden you have a red truck with white speckles everywhere. anywhere there's a ding soaks up a glob of wax, whereas the truly smooth places, the wax flows out consistently. pores, all of them.

    this pore filling occurs in the barrel at the microscopic level. there are little pores, and you're sealing them up by sliding pressurized copper over them. the copper slides just fine, til it has a hole to fill. then the pressure forces some copper in the hole. and the next time a bullet comes down the barrel, that's one less "error" in the machining of the barrel. on the second go around, the bullet slides right over that filled pore, and when you hit the next pore, you've got some more copper from the new bullet that didn't deposit copper in the first pore. we're filling microscopic pores, so the odds of affecting anything to any extent really are nil. but... for spending what we do on rifles, why not do it? i can't see it hurting anything.

    which makes me wonder about burning out the throat. i'm very curious how having a dirty barrel is protective of the throat. this i news to me and i'd love to know more about this, how the break-in is somehow harder on the throat than simply firing the weapon.


    about new products being "as smooth as they'll ever get". i buy valenite and kennemetal inserts for my lathe. these are usa made, serious quality cutting inserts. but...when you install a new insert, you have to slow your machining speed down about ~15%. why? because the "precision ground and honed" carbide substrate has microscopic pores. even after being pvd coated. a new cutter at 100% speed just acts funny. it's not quite a chatter, it's not quite a vibration. but you can hear that the insert is fighting to shear metal. and the finish produced by a brand new cutter isn't nearly as nice a cutter that's been run a little bit. once these pores are filled with material that is picked up while being used to cut... you can go back to your optimum speed. a perfect example of microscopic pore filling yeilding observable real world results.

    but i'm not going to go so far as to guarantee someone that a rifle will perform better or worse if you do or do not do a break in. i fully understand that the barrels are in fact nice and shiny smooth from the factory. i'm not sure you'd be able to measure the group differences to be able to tell if one definitively out shot the other.

    i'm just not seeing the break in hurting anything. any info would be apreciated.