Brass in my face

Discussion in 'M, C, L and S Series' started by recurve, Feb 24, 2018.

  1. recurve

    recurve Member

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    Hi,

    I got a new Steyr S9-A1 and tried it for the first time today.

    Love a lot about this pistol. My only real gripe is the brass has a 50% chance of hitting me in the forehead or face. The ejection seems erratic.

    I've searched this board and found some people talking about 1911 parts and others about getting replacement bits directly from Steyr.

    Since my S9-A1 is new wouldn't it already have the replacement bits? What advice do you have? Thanks!
     
  2. Thomas

    Thomas Member

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    What ammo are you shooting? Have you tried 147 grain?

    T
     

  3. Miksti

    Miksti New Member

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    I don't know if I would call that an issue yet. As long as there is not a stoppage. With my S9-A1, I have had 2 cases in my front pocket that I found on the way home from the range and had one stick on my glasses, even after a 1000 rounds. My slide would have a lot of brass chips in there too, at first . The important thing is I have not had any FTEs . Some shooters have bent the ejector and other remedies. Autos are irritating anyway , especially if you want to save brass and not step on cases while you're training. I eject all my cases from my snubbie in a hat. I wouldn't start replacing parts just yet; but take it for what its worth. I forgot to mention that ,like Thomas some shooters have noted that the Steyrs run better with 124 or 147 gr. ammo. I have shot some HP rounds ; but because I didn't know any better most of my exposure is with 115 gr. fmj.
     
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  4. Thomas

    Thomas Member

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    I did read a review by a guy whose favorite 9mm ammo for his S9-A1 was 147 grain hp.

    I'll see if I can find it.

    T
     
  5. STGirl

    STGirl New Member

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    Try full power loads.
    My L9's tend to do that with lower power loadings, and since so many manufacturers today tend to load their 9mm on the slow side....weak ejection.
    Try some NATO velocity and you should see strong ejection.
     
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  6. SurfGent

    SurfGent Active Member

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  7. recurve

    recurve Member

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    Thanks for the advice everyone.

    I shot 50 rounds of 124 grain Winchester Winclean NT.

    I shot another 20 rounds of 90 grain copper frangible Sinterfire.

    I had problems with brass in the face with both the 124 and the 90 grain. I did have 2 FTE as well.

    I have not tried 147 grain - will need to check on that. Would be a bummer if it doesn't shoot reliably with the lighter rounds. <<sigh>>

    I took a close look at the ejector rod. Should it be straight? Mine is bent a bit toward the right. I didn't look at it closely before I took the pistol to the range. With one of the FTE I could not lock the slide back. I could pull back the slide but I could not engage the slide stop. The round was coming back with the slide so... maybe it was hitting the ejector rod not giving me enough room to engage the slide stop.
     
  8. SurfGent

    SurfGent Active Member

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    It is a bummer. Try the 147 grn but your right should eat anything. You might consider calling steyr and complaine not enough of us do that and get the pistol sent to them to fix. Its a hassle but that feed back helps in the over situation of them not putting out junk
     
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  9. caskenette

    caskenette New Member

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    Seems to be a VERY common complaint . They should fire , cycle , eject all weights of 9MM ammo properly , and in my opinion not into my glasses or the top of my head . My opinion ,this is a new gun , as is mine , +1000 rounds through it , works as poorly today as it did day one . Obviously just does not function correctly and no fix in sight from Steyr . Next time around something other than a Steyr is the answer .
     
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  10. Anthony Smith

    Anthony Smith New Member

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    I guess I got lucky with my L9. It’s brand new, shot it about 80 times today with the cheapest tulammo from Walmart. 0 Failures, it cycles perfectly and all my ejections were at the 3 o’clock position.
    It’s a damn fine pistol.


     
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  11. Thomas

    Thomas Member

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    You will hear about "very common" BTF complaints on the Glock forum too from a handful of disgruntled owners. Happy owners usually don't come on forums to complain. Granted there are genuine complaints. But, as an instructor/armorer I've owned and shot a couple of dozen Glocks and still own half that many, I've never had a problem with that.

    My sole Steyr is the L9-A1 purchased a few months ago. I only have about 300 rounds downrange so far but have no trouble with the BTF. Winchester NATO 124 fmj has become my regular range ammo for the Steyr and well as my both of my Glock 17s.

    Steyr is a well made, solid piece of ordinance. I would prefer to give the company the benefit of the doubt and am willing to give their customer service a fair chance to fix any problems.

    T
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2018
  12. recurve

    recurve Member

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    Well said. Nothing is perfect all the time and Steyr is a good company and been around as long as any (well ok, Beretta is the oldest but still). Yesterday I phoned and spoke with Jeff Reece at Steyr Arms. I sent him some photographs of the ejection port.

    aaron_S9-A1_3147730_ejection_rod_slightly_bent.jpg
    aaron_S9-A1_3147730_ejection_port_view_1.jpg
    aaron_S9-A1_3147730_ejection_port_view_2.jpg
     
  13. recurve

    recurve Member

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    The official stance is to shoot it more and let it break in.

    "9mm STEYR pistols have always been particular about some ammunition through the break in period and prefer a heavier bullet and being based on the .40 S&W platform. We have had the best results with 124gr MAGTECH and 147gr FEDERAL AMERICAN EAGLE here in our indoor range and at the outdoor range. After the first 3 to 400 rounds the pistol should perform as advertised, you may get an occasional round back at you but it should be way less prevalent the more you shoot. If it doesn't please let me know."

    I'm not sure what that means... maybe the springs are too heavy for 115 gr? But if you shoot enough they loosen up and work ok with 115 gr? I was shooting both 90 gr and 124 gr. The 124 gr was Winchester Winclean NT. I shot 20 rounds of the light stuff and 50 rounds of the heavy. I can shoot more and see what happens.
     
  14. Thomas

    Thomas Member

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    Yes, the recoil springs are a little heavy. That can necessitate hotter ammo to ensure robust cycling. Not uncommon with the occasional Glock either.

    T
     
  15. RWW

    RWW New Member

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    I just picked up an L9-A1 a couple of weekends ago. I was concerned about excessive BTF and erratic ejection based on various threads I’ve seen but I’m happy to say I have not had any issues so far other than one failure to fire (Win NATO 124) which fired on the second try. The primer looked like it had a decent enough indent the first time around. I have just shy of 900 rounds through this gun. Other than the NATO, I’ve tried Federal 124+p HST and 147 HST, Geco 124 and Hornady Critical Duty 135+p. Seems to be stiffly sprung so I would expect the potential for some weak ejection with weak Ammo. My Gen4 Glocks love the hotter loads, the G17 is a tackdriver with the WW NATO stuff.
     
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  16. recurve

    recurve Member

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    Question for everyone:

    With the trigger clenched, hand cycling the slide is smooth and easy.

    With the trigger relaxed, hand cycling the slide is rough and more difficult. It’s like there is a hump that you have to clear before it moves freely.

    Is this typical? Or maybe it is a clue as to why the ejection is bad half the time and good the other times. I could subconsciously be releasing the trigger when the “bang” occurs creating more resistance.
     
  17. RWW

    RWW New Member

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    The slight does not move equally "easy" at all points in its travel. I would put several hundred rounds of full power ammo through that gun and make sure your are locking your wrists and elbows while shooting. Even if that rod is a tiny bit off I'd tend to think your problem would be consistent as opposed to inconsistent.
     
  18. coltc

    coltc New Member

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    Brass to the face and erratic ejection are a feature of the S9A1 and C9A1.

    They all seem to do it, Steyr doesn't care. If it bothers you, sell it and buy something else.

    This is coming from a C9A1 owner.
     
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  19. recurve

    recurve Member

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    Thanks coltc. Really seems like hit or miss. Some people have issues others don't.

    I like the feel of the S9-A1. It is a chunky-monkey but that's what I wanted. I was looking for something smaller than my Beretta Cougar 8000 but I didn't want a skinny single stack.

    I've lubed up the S9-A1 really well and will try again, 115 gr or similar. If that doesn't work I'll order some 150 gr which is the heaviest I can find readily available.

    I will say that the Cougar had no issues from day one BUT it is loose fitting. While I've never handled a 92 fs I hear they have a fair amount of slop too. Perhaps that is why they cycle easily. The Steyr S9-A1, by comparison, is like a fine tuned Swiss watch. There isn't any play, not a smidgen of rattle. It has very close tolerances. So maybe the close tolerances mean it does need to have a break-in period, to loosen it up.

    I don't like the idea of a break-in period but it is what it is. To me... using snap caps and cycling the Cougar and the S9-A1 slowly... it seems as though the ejection rod is too short on the S9-A1. You have to get the slide all the way back before that little rod peeps through to kick out the casing. Also, comparatively, the Cougar will release the snap cap with very little effort. The S9-A1 needs muscle. You have to push really hard before the snap cap releases and falls out.

    Hmm... maybe that is it? Maybe the break in period isn't so much the tolerances of the slide but that stiff hold of the casing that needs to release easier... and with use maybe that is what it will do.
     
  20. recurve

    recurve Member

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    I hear about a "break in" period with pistols. I never knew if it was legit or an excuse but it does make sense that if tolerances are close that maybe they do need to settle in with use.

    I researched a bit and found two references that resonated with me.

    The first is a web page where they talk about getting the pistol hot (from shooting) to accelerate wear. In particular this quote is telling: "The criteria I use for determining whether a gun is broken in or needs more testing is how it ejects. A properly broken in gun will eject consistently, and the ejection will be the same whether the gun is hot or cold. The ultimate test is that you are able to run 1,000 rounds in succession without a malfunction." Here's the link:

    http://www.brazoscustom.com/magart/0705.htm

    The second is a video on YouTube where the guy compares Glocks both new and old. You can hear the difference, a loud squeaky noise, even on a lubed new Glock that the old does not have. He advises running the Action and dry firing numerous times (a lot) before you go to the range to accelerate the break-in without using ammo. He also said, as members of Steyr Club and Steyr USA have said, to fire at least 100 rounds of 147 gr 9mm ammo (heavy) to help the break in before going to 115 gr:



    You could say "I told you so" but something about the way these two people backed up their claim made me appreciate the wisdom more and wanted to share.

    Summary - to break in a tight fitting pistol:

    1) Use lots of lube
    2) Cycle and dry fire the action before going to the range.
    3) Fire 147 gr - as much as you can afford - at least 100 rounds but maybe 500.

    At that point maybe it will be broken in and 115 gr will work fine.
     
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