AR project...advice please

Discussion in 'Anything Else' started by RangerM9, May 4, 2005.

  1. RangerM9

    RangerM9 New Member

    192
    0
    0
    Hi all,

    I'm starting to get interested in an AR project. Been reading things over on AR15.com....but really i get the feeling that pretty much everyone over there is way more advanced in gunsmithing than I am. Has anyone here built their own AR?...how much experience did you have with the guns before you decided to build one? I guess i could just go out and buy an AR, but I would like to build one actually...plus i can spread out the purchases a bit...de-stress the wallet. But i also don't want to get started, and then not be able to get it to work...

    any advice?...any references i should look up?

    thanks,

    Greg
     

  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    ARF.com is probably your best source, but check through the Black Rifle forum on GlockTalk as well. Several of those guys have built their own and posted a great deal of information over there. I think the best advice I've heard is to stick to mainstream/reputable parts suppliers.

    I wanted to build my own too, but I decided to buy a basic one and take a carbine class and spend some significant time shooting it as well. I'll get a chance to play around with disassembling it, etc., and I can decide what I like and dislike and get a better idea of how I want to build mine. Plus, you can unload a factory one a lot easier than a home built without losing too much.
     
  3. RangerM9

    RangerM9 New Member

    192
    0
    0
    Thanks for the advice

    Thanks for the input guys,

    MrApathy, good to see you! I've missed your sage wisdom.

    I have done a number of searches, read a lot of posts and instructions, but in most cases there is so much assumed...i.e. they assume you know what every little pin is called, and acronyms etc... I guess i will probably need to take my time and read a lot more. No prob....it is an idea at this point...not a need....so i can take as much time as needed to get up to speed on the subject.

    And Hushh....that is another option for me....to buy a complete one and learn from that what I like and dislike, and how it all fits together.

    thanks again.
     
  4. RangerM9

    RangerM9 New Member

    192
    0
    0
    Excellent info, thanks

    Thanks again for the info and advice Mr A....I'm pretty sure i can handle the tinker toys and errector sets, used to be quite proficient with lego's in my youth as well... :lol: ...Seriously though, with enough info ahead of time, i'm pretty sure i can make it work. The leads you have given me will be a great help.

    Greg
     
  5. Alabama

    Alabama New Member

    74
    0
    0
    Be confident, Ranger...Figger that recruits can break the things down in less than 10 seconds in the dark with one hand, and they get only 8 weeks to learn. It's an amazingly ergonomic design and has few parts to familiarize yourself with.
    As always, follow the advice Mr. A gives: Study. I'll bet within a few days you'll know a lot more than you thought you could.
     
  6. RangerM9

    RangerM9 New Member

    192
    0
    0
    more than a few days....

    yep....i sort of figured that if the military folk can break them down that fast...i can probably learn to do it without the time limits...

    It will be more than a few days before i am up to speed...just got tossed one of life's little curveballs....but i will get there at some point....
     
  7. FWF

    FWF New Member

    35
    0
    0
    Both of my AR's are home-assembled. It's really a pretty easy project so long as you've scouted the terrain and collected the neccessary tools.

    A good basic publication to start off with is the M16A2 USMC Technical Manual. It includes the essential schematics, torque specs and tool lists.

    Some of the more weapon specific tools you ought to have: roll pin punches, M16 armorer's combo wrench, Peace River upper receiver block (safely holds upper in a vise) and a torque wrench. If you're going to mess around with CAR butt stocks you'll need a spanner wrench for that (the same spanner is used on some NM free-float barrel sleeves). If you're going to work with tubular free-floating handguards you'll need an appropriate spanner or strap wrench.

    You won't really save any money on the first one (because of tooling costs), but with the tools on hand you'll be ready for additional AR projects (who can stop at one?) and you'll be able to save by doing your own repairs.
     
  8. FlaChef

    FlaChef Guest

    I've thought about trying out some different builds to see what it is I like.

    Find some to shoot, and if you know anyone w/ one have them walk you through some basic maintenance stuff.
     
  9. RangerM9

    RangerM9 New Member

    192
    0
    0
    I wish i knew someone with one

    Unfortunately I don't know anyone who has one....amongst friends and family, not too many people into the firearms like I am. I'll just take my time...save my money....and when it all comes down to it....I will probably just buy complete upper and lower for my first AR...would be fun to build from ground up...but that may be more than i am ready to bite off on a first try.

    thanks for the advice,
     
  10. ministerofdeath

    ministerofdeath New Member

    925
    0
    0
    Not as hard as you would think to put together an M-Forgery. I just purchased not too long ago a Stag Arms lower and I'm waiting on a Stag Arms upper. Great finish, I've heard nothing but good things about the way they shoot and the price is awesome.