Ammo too Hot ?

Discussion in 'Ammunition and Reloading' started by nixon, Oct 7, 2006.

  1. nixon

    nixon Member

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    Steyr Guru's Madecov, Big T and others,
    Just found sometime to test fire 165 gr. blazer brass and 165 Amer Eagle. I found it a little too hot for me. After looking at the primer, I found halo mark around the firing pin dimple and it's a bit flattened. To make sue it's not a fluke, I looked at almost every single one and found the same observation. I'm wondering if this is really normal for this 2 ammo brand ?
    The Eagle was very accurate while the blazer is very good. Having difficulty controlling muzzle rise, hence, I have to benched it at 25 yrd. most of the time to get enjoyable accuracy. However, my M40-A1 was flawless with these ammo.

    Input Please !!!
    thanks,
    Nixon
     
  2. MrApathy

    MrApathy Active Member

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    which primers flattened?

    CCI shouldnt flatten much tough primers. takes warm to heavy loads to flatten.

    Federal has soft primers and will flatten easily and get all sorts of firing pin marks easily.

    firing pin drift mark in primer is not uncommon.

    CCI Gold Dot 165gr is pretty stout but effective if controlled.
    shooting heavy stuff more can help along with a simple 5 lbs weight in the hand.
     

  3. nixon

    nixon Member

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    I was thinking about u this a.m. The Fedral Amer Eagle flattened. This ammo is bit too hot for me. Either I need to streghthen my wrist or shoot it at the 12 yrd range to get better accuracy. I have a modified isosceles stance - favoring my shooting arm a bit and just slightly bent elbow not locked. Also, I think I need to get some time to get adjusted to shooting polymer pistol. This is my first one.
    thanks MrAphathy
     
  4. MrApathy

    MrApathy Active Member

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    you might want to try Federal Hydrashock low recoil Hydrashock ammo. 135gr is as easy to shoot as 9mm though more potent than most commercial 9mm loads.

    180gr can be slightly nicer than 165gr and imo much nicer than 150-155gr. less snap. but 150-155gr can be snappy it can also get back on target fast but some loads make me feel like my wrist is cracking. some 150-155gr loads can be nice shooting most commercial ones I have shot have not been very pleasant except Federal which is lower speed and recoil.

    steyr handles recoil pretty good for polymer pistol. its truely more of a hybrid steel and polymer pistol than most other polymer guns.
     
  5. nixon

    nixon Member

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    Mr. Apahthy,
    I will try your advise and shoot 135 gr. By then I would have tried a wide range of bullet weight and from there, I can make the best decision I could and have confidence to stick with it. My 40-a1 does not like the 180gr., it shoots like a shotgun pattern, so it's basically eliminated.
    Thanks so much for your sharing and generosity. Have a nice evening or afternoon whichever is the case.
    Nixon
     
  6. FlaChef

    FlaChef Guest

    try following the grip tutorial stickied in the Tactics and Training section. It's not so much a matter of wrist stength as it is locking them, and then creating isometric tension in your arms.

    Yes I would certainly recomend spending a little more time on the 12 yard range for practice if your still getting used to the gun (esp. if you are used to steel guns).

    Blazer brass tends to be a bit cooler than WWB in my experience (though not by much)