1st time shooting M-40 and she jammed 6/150!!!!

Discussion in 'M, C, L and S Series' started by mauifreediver, Oct 13, 2012.

  1. mauifreediver

    mauifreediver New Member

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    Hey guys, I'm new to the steyr world and just recently to her to the range. I bought reloads that looked super clean,but the Steyr just did not like them. The casing weren't totally ejecting and I had to pull the unfired round that was butted up to the shell. Scary stuff!! I'm also very new to shooting so excuse my terminology of trying to describe the issue. I tried all three mags, and same thing happened with them all. I did shoot new bullets (50 rounds) with not a jam. Why do these guns not like reloads. My friend was shooting the same reloads from his HK and had no jam at all. Can y'all help me with this issue. I really want to shoot, but cant afford new bullets every time. Any suggestion would be appreciated. Mahalo!!!
     
  2. Talyn

    Talyn New Member

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    new guns can be fussy on reloads.
    thats really as simple as it can be.

    Guns are like cars, they have a break in period.

    You'll hear people brag that their gun never needed a break in, but they are lieing most of the time.

    Get a few hundred rounds though it then try the reloads again.

    Once the ...

    okay, well my brain is broke and I cannot think of the correct terms at the moment.

    Reverting to dummy talk.

    Once the part of the barrel where the bullets go into to fire is broke in, it will be less fussy about it.
    its like when you buy something new and its a bit stiff till it has been used a bit?
    Yeah, like that.

    Like a motor with fresh cross cut in the cylinders.
     

  3. 73sbVert

    73sbVert Member

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    Feed ramp. ;)


    :leaving:
     
  4. MrApathy

    MrApathy Active Member

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    general rule to only shoot your own reloads. steyr is not picky
    I would chalk it up to some bad reloads. I shot many many thousands of reloads
    in my original M40 without a hitch when I did my job on making the ammo though I did mess up 1 batch and got all the hitches I could ever want was good practice for jams.
     
  5. Talyn

    Talyn New Member

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    That's the part before the chamber.

    I don't know WTH happened though, my mind just went blank yesterday.

    Steyrs definitely dont have any feed ramp issues. One of the best I've seen.
     
  6. Talyn

    Talyn New Member

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    Generally that's the issue.
    He could have a bad sizing dye (couldnt' think of that yesterday either) and the bullets are out of spec.

    Your having extractor troubles because the gun isn't ready for out of wack ammo.
    He's not having issues because his gun is broke in.

    Be sure to clean that all out really good before your next shoot as well.
    If there was some left overs from the MFG, it could be sticking on there too because the reload cases were probably expanding more than the factory rounds due to powder types or amounts.
     
  7. jhb

    jhb Member

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    I avoid reloads like the plague. If the person making them knows what they are doing and has the proper tooling then ill use them....problem is most reloaders, don't and don't.

    I use to go to a range that only allowed you to shot their reloads. Watched one gun squib and shooter didn't catch on and pulled the trigger again and gun exploded. Watched two other guns explode from overcharged .40 s&w reloads.

    It got where shooting wasn't fun worrying about squibs and over charges, so I stopped going...was cheapest place to shoot in town, but somethings aren't worth going cheap on.

    Plus around here folks think reloads are better than factory so everyone and their brother is making 'em. Most are borderline crap to be nice.

    Those events ruined me on reloads.

    I guess in rare and expensive calibers it makes sense...but in 9mmx19 and even .40s&w, factory wins out everytime without exception, imho.

    My guess is those reloads you were shooting, were out of specs just enough to not feed properly. Which is extremely common. Steyrs have amazingly, imho, tight tolerances....which is why they are so accurate. Just a guess though.
     
  8. mauifreediver

    mauifreediver New Member

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    Thanks for your guys thoughts.I will talk with the fellow who makes the reloads. He runs a pretty tight ship!! Same guy who was my CHL instructor makes these reloads. Good guy and knows his stuff. Ill ask him ever so kindly :)
     
  9. manChild_762

    manChild_762 New Member

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    I will say one thing about range reloads. I remember that I shot an HK USP in 40 and the thing locked up so bad that it would release the slide back to eject the spent brass. Got the range officer there and he thought it was a 9mm when I told him that I only used their reloaded range ammo. Needless to say I never purchase reloaded ammo.
    If its factory awesome, and I am now starting to reload myself so I will keep tight tolerances since its a single stage Forster press. But that is the only ammo I will shoot out of my guns. If someone else has reloaded it, I will not touch it and it doesn't go into my guns.
     
  10. Talyn

    Talyn New Member

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    That's what I was going on.
    The chamber is tight enough where he didn't size his casings well enough and it jammed them in there.
    Very very very common.
    Most people don't inspect their brass individually, nor check it with micrometers while reloading either.
     
  11. MrApathy

    MrApathy Active Member

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    sizing is only a issue when its glock shot brass which has a bulge at webbing of brass not all sizer dies go low enough to resolve that. crimping or removing the belling to seat the bullet is the issue that will prohibit feeding and extraction.

    its totally worth it these days to reload 9mm and 40sw. can make inexpensive ammo that can do more or less of what factory ammo can. the more part is nicer nothing like sending 180gr bullets in 40sw 1150fps which beats out all but couple manufactures of factory ammo and the couple that do manufacture it want big bucks for it.
     
  12. Doc

    Doc New Member

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    Hey now, I've ran probably about 1200 rounds through my Steyr without a single hitch. Not lying! :thumbsup:

    However, I've never put any reloads through her, so that helps.
     
  13. Talyn

    Talyn New Member

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    I was referring to the GlockTards.

    You know, the guys who have the whole in the engine block and you can clearly see it while your standing right there talking to them, but they are telling you their truck runs great and they have never had any problems?

    yeah.

    People are so dishonest about products or their stuff because of pride or brand loyalty. Be honest when you have a problem with it!

    I've had 6 FTE's with my Steyr using bulk ammo.
    I'm averaging 1 every 100 rounds. It happens.
     
  14. jhb

    jhb Member

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    True the unsupported chamber problem ...well put.

    On reloads, Sir, are you including your labor into the price per round? I say that cause if you write off your time as hobby.....I get that. If you apply a value to your time though, reloads in 9mm and .40s&w start to come closer to cheaper factory loads.

    I never seem to have enough time running my businesses and raising my boy and playing with my wife and hobbys galore.......Im willing to pay a premium myself to steal more time for other hobbies and family time. Truth be told, I'm a lazy sort when it comes to free time..... id rather spend the afternoon brim fishing than reloading. Yeah I know I'm not a true hobbyist...but I can live with that.;)
     
  15. jhb

    jhb Member

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    Yes Sir...and you did a fine job stating it first. I was agreeing with your assessment...just did a poor job making it obvious. ;)

    So true. Round here many jump into reloading as its easy to get into, but many also skip lots of learning......my take on reloads is unfair and biased....ill admit it. Keeps my firearms and myself safer though. So I can live with that.
     
  16. Talyn

    Talyn New Member

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    Thanks, I wasn't trying to point out I made it first, but was trying to point out you finished my thought and made it solvent. =)
     
  17. MrApathy

    MrApathy Active Member

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    factoring labor its still worth it atleast for me dont have a business or kids
    instead of just watching tv I reload with tv or radio on. no reloaders I know of use micrometer to measure ammo now they all should use calipers to .001,.0005 and .0001 with most load data being accurate only to .001 anything smaller doesnt hold much consequence
    that said I know of reloaders that dont put much quality control in theyre reloads which scares me but its theyre gun theyre using not mine.

    reloading is fun hobby and great survival skill to know who knows some day you may not be able to simply buy ammo as you can today after the colorado shooting and some others anti gunners are looking to put restrictions on ammo and have in the past. serial number bullets and firing pins are a couple idea's they have tried in the past. that happens I bet alot of people would get into reloading too late and casting. starting out in reloading takes time as I suggest keep a close eye on the quality control and once you get going its okay to let up as your more experienced.
     
  18. Wulf

    Wulf Premium Member

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    Yep, what he said -->

    But then, there's animals like me, aka narcissists who want to stay safe reloading. Practice an' fun time rounds are one thing, but developin' a high performance round for my M357-A1, well, that's another story entirely. There's no room for fu*kup loads when you're resizin' your .357 bullets to be used in ammo made for .355 or .356 applications with high pressure loads, for instance. The thought of not periodically checkin' my reloads, either for target or pushin' the performance envelope while reloading never occurred to me. A double charge with Bullseye could be a very bad experience, I imagine. <shrug>

    Confidence is wonderful, as long as you are aware of the consequences of "overconfidence".

    Lesson here is don't get overconfident with your reloads. That is never a good thing, IMHO.

    Wulf <-- knows how ta flattin' primers :thumbsup:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
  19. ETH77

    ETH77 Premium Member

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    +1 to that!

    I just got back from testing my 0.312, 150gr 7.62x39 reloads. Started small with H322 - 46.1 gr, gonna sneak up to 48 gr. You better believe I weighed every charge, and measured every round. Working up a load is serious business. For me, no radio, no TV, not even any music, just the smooth rhythm of the press strokes.
     
  20. Talyn

    Talyn New Member

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    For me, the quiet on tasks like this are part of being a man.

    Though, I'll make an exception for talk radio in these cases. That's because of my grandfather though. He'd only listen to talk radio if he he wanted background noise in the reloading shed.